Posts Tagged ‘Audiobooks’

Book Review: The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty by Dan Ariely

Author: Dan Ariely
Title: The (Honest) Truth About Dishonesty
Narrator: Simon Jones
Publication Info: Harper Collins, 2012
ISBN: 9780062209320
Summary/Review:

This book is a psychological and sociological investigation into lying, with the emphasis on the ways in which all humans more or less lie and cheat throughout their whole lives.  Ariely notes that while big scandals like say Enron get headlines for their irrational amount of dishonesty, that these types of problems grow from the small actions of many people making cost-benefit analysis rather than high-level conspiracy.  Interesting anecdotes about lying are backed-up by tests and studies.  To be honest, I’ve allowed too much time from listening to this audiobook to writing about, so I’m now fuzzy on the details.  But I do recall it is a fascinating book entertainingly performed by Simon Jones.

Rating: ***

Book Review: The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis

AuthorAyana Mathis
TitleThe Twelve Tribes of Hattie
Narrators: Adam Lazarre-White, Bahni Turpin, and Adenrele Ojo
Publication Info: Books on Tape, 2012
Summary/Review: This somber novel tells the stories of a woman named Hattie who migrates from Georgia to Philadelphia in the 1920s, and her subsequent life and that of her children.  The novel is a series of connected stories, each focusing on a different child from dates ranging from the 1920s to 1980s.  The family perseveres against poverty, racism, mental illness and internal strife.  I found it a well-written story that approaches family life and the African-American experience from different angles.  The audiobook is also well-performed with different narrators reading stories from the different children’s perspectives.

Recommended booksBailey’s Cafe by Gloria Naylor, Strivers Row by Kevin Baker, and Jazz by Toni Morrison
Rating: ***

Book Review: One Summer: America 1927

Author and Narrator: Bill Bryson
TitleOne Summer: America 1927
Publication Info: Random House Audio, 2013
Other books read by the same author:

Summary/Review:

Bill Bryson’s talent is to delve deep into a subject, find all the minute details, and then tie them together into a bigger story.  For this work, the title explains it all: one summer in the United States when a remarkable number of historical events occurred, many with unexpected connections.

The main feature of this book is Charles Lindbergh and his historic flight from New York to Paris aboard the Spirit of St. Louis.  And then there is the aftermath in which Lindbergh deals with his celebrity, a level of worldwide renown perhaps unprecedented in history.  Other aviators who had hoped to contend for the Orteig Prize, are given their due as well, with descriptions of their less-famous flights (if they managed to get off the ground).

The book is balanced by the story of another hero, Babe Ruth.  In the 1927, Ruth would break his own remarkable single-season home run record and be joined in a race by teammate Lou Gehrig.  In fact, the entire Yankees’ lineup hit so well that they’re forever known as Murderers’ Row and one of the best teams in baseball history.  Bryson cheats a lot, leaving the summer of 1927 to fill in the back stories of Lindbergh and Ruth and other figures, and occasionally even peeking ahead.  But the meat of this book is stories of events from that summer, including:

  • the sensational Snyder-Gray murder trial
  • the apogee of Al Capone’s power as a mob boss
  • the government poisoning alcohol at the behest of Wayne Wheeler of the Anti-Saloon League
  • the Federal Reserve makes decisions that sow the seeds of the 1929 stock market crash
  • radio comes of age
  • The Jazz Singer ushers in the talkie
  • television created
  • the execution of Sacco and Vanzetti
  • carving of Mount Rushmore begins
  • massive flooding of the Mississippi River
  • the Bath School bombing
  • Henry Ford transitions from the Model T to the Model A
  • The Long Count fight between Gene Tunney and Jack Dempsey

The whole book is fascinating and full of interesting details of a transitional time in American history.
Rating: ****

 

 

Book Review: The Race Underground by Doug Most

AuthorDoug Most
Narrator: John H. Mayer
TitleThe Race Underground
Publication Info: Books on Tape, 2014
ISBN: 9780553398069
Summary/Review:

This fascinating study documents the race between Boston and New York to be the first city to have underground rapid transit.  Spoiler:  Boston wins the race, but the modest Tremont Street subway would soon be overshadowed by New York City opening an extensive network of subways covering hundreds of miles all at once.  This work includes a lot of tangents into the engineering, technological, and social changes of the late-19th century and early 20th-century in delightful ways.  Most frames the story around two brothers - Henry Melville Whitney of Boston and William Collins Whitney of New York City – who were behind the push for improved transit in their cities, but the stories of many politicians, engineers, financiers, dreamers, and ordinary people amazed (or frightened) by the changing world around them.  The story is not without tragedy as people died building both subways, not to mention a fair amount of corruption, but ultimately this is a triumphant story about the progress of humankind.

Recommended books722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York by Clifton Hood , A City So Grand: The Rise of an American Metropolis, Boston 1850-1900 by Stephen Puleo, Underneath New York by Harry Granick , Subway Style by New York Transit Museum, Change at Park Street Under: The story of Boston’s subways by Brian J. Cudahy, and Tremont Street Subway A Century of Public Service by Bradley H. Clarke.

Rating: ****

Book Review: Where God Was Born by Bruce Feiler

Author:Bruce Feiler
TitleWhere God Was Born
Publication Info: HarperAudio (2005)
ISBN: 9780060888572
Summary/Review:

Feiler’s book is a unique combination of travelogue, history, theology, and personal growth.  Feiler documents his journeys to Israel, Iraq, and Iran to visit the sites of places mentioned in the Hebrew scriptures.  There’s a lot of interesting discussion of the Israelites and the connection to land, but how the religion was born only once they were taken from the land.  There are also hints that the Babylonian captivity was not as bad as depicted in the bible.  Feiler also has an interesting take on David, the flawed hero, who spent many years as a bandit and even collaborated with the enemies of Israel. Perhaps the most remarkable part of the book is when he worships with a Jewish community in Iran who have a surprising amount of religious freedom, something Feiler traces back to the Persian king Cyrus who liberated the Israelites from captivity.  He also traces Zoroastrian influences to the Abrahamic religions to this period.  In the end, Feiler finds in the Bible a blueprint for religious tolerance and understanding that could be followed today.
Rating: ***1/2

Book Review: Cheap: The High Cost of Discount Culture by Ellen Ruppel Shell

Author: Ellen Ruppel Shell, Lorna Raver (narrator)
Title: Cheap: The High Cost of Discount Culture
Publication Info: Tantor Media (2009)
ASIN: B002HIT0SG
Summary/Review:

Cheap is an intriguing expose on the modern American desire for bargains fed by discount stores and discount ideology in more areas of commerce than one would realize.  Ruppel Shell offers a fascinating history of discount stores from the late 19th-century to present.  Interestingly, many of the originators went under by the 1980s to be absorbed by the more ruthless corporations of today.  The hidden costs of inexpensive purchases are then detailed from environmental destruction, human rights violations of the employees who manufacture, distribute, and sell the products, the dangers of poor quality goods to the consumer, the erosion of the middle class, and the fact that a lot of this cheap stuff isn’t even worth what we pay for it.  Ruppel Shell makes the interesting point that we now live in a world where there are high-end goods and discount goods, but no reliable in-between.  IKEA, Wal-Mart, and outlet malls are singled out as some actors in the discount culture, but the closing “hope-for-the-future” chapter also details companies like Wegmans and Costco that are thriving despite adopting strategies that go against the grain of discount culture.  While the essence of this book is not likely to be surprising to most readers, it is still eye-opening in its details.


Recommended books:Free Lunch: How the Wealthiest Americans Enrich Themselves at Government Expense (and Stick You with the Bill) by David Cay Johnston, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America by Barbara Ehrenreich, and In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto by Michael Pollan,
Rating:****

Book Review: Gregor and the Code of the Claw by Suzanne Collins

AuthorSuzanne Collins
TitleGregor and the Code of the Claw
Publication Info: [New York] : Listening Library, 2008.
ISBN: 9780739364895
Summary/Review:
The final volume of The Underland Chronicles completes the fascinating and well-written series.  While at heart a war story, it finds its protagonist Gregor grappling with ethical dilemmas, mortality, and fate.  And if you’re like me and thought the prophecies of Sandwich were too overbearing in the earlier novels, it was a relief to see what Ripred and Gregor make of the final prophecy.  The Underland Chronicles are a worthy addition to fantasy literature and something readers of all ages should enjoy.
Rating: ****

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