Posts Tagged ‘Links’

Boston Walking Tours 2009

Last year I posted a list of walking tours in the Boston area in hopes of encouraging people to get out and explore the history, architecture, culture, topography, and nature of the area.  I’ve updated the list and links for 2009, once again giving primacy of place to the two organizations in which I volunteer to lead tours.

Boston By Foot – Boston’s premier walking tour organization is well worth becoming a member to take advantage of free tours, discounted special tours, and members-only events.  Check out the Boston By Foot Meetup Group as well for unique tour announcements.  I’ve highlighted the tours that I guide in bold below, although many other wonderful guides also lead these tours.

Seven classic tours take you around historic Boston:

  • Beacon Hill
  • Boston By Little Feet
  • Boston Underfoot
  • Heart of the Freedom Trail
  • Literary Landmarks
  • North End
  • Victorian Back Bay

Make sure to check out special Boston Harborfest tours offered June 30-July 5:

And don’t miss the special Tours of the Month offered on the last Sunday of each month at 2 pm:

Jamaica Plain Historical Society – 1 hour tours every Saturday morning at 11 am (Jamaica Pond tour is 90 minutes).  Again, the tours in bold will be led by yours truly.

Tour Date Location Tour Date Location
June 20 Woodbourne August 22 Jamaica Pond
June 27 Jamaica Pond August 29 Monument Sq
July 11 Monument Sq Sept 12 Sumner Hill
July 18 Sumner Hill Sept 19 Stony Brook
July 25 Stony Brook Sept 26 Hyde Square
August 1 Hyde Square October 3 Green Street
August 8 Green Street October 17 Woodbourne
August 15 Woodbourne October 24 Jamaica Pond


In alphabetical order below are a number of other walking tours I’ve heard about by word of mouth or web search.  I only have personal experience with a few of these organizations so don’t consider making the list an endorsement. If you know of any good walking tours in Boston not listed below, I’d love to add them to the list, so please post in the comments.

Appalachian Mountain Club – The Boston Chapter has a Local Walks Committee offering hikes to condition oneself for the mountains, nature walks, and social walks.
Arnold Arboretum – Boston’s tree museum offers regular highlight tours and special theme tours. Come back again because the tour changes depending on the season.
Audissey Guides – Download a tour narrated by local personalities for your mp3 player.
Black Heritage Trail – A tour of African-American history in Boston led by National Park Service guides, or you can take a self-guided tour.
Evening Walkers – A Meetup.com group for people who like walking. No narration, just scenery and a chance to meet people.
Friends of the Blue Hills – Group hikes and nature walks in the Blue Hills Reservation.
Brookline Food Tour – The way to Brookline’s heart is through your stomach.
Boston Athenæum – Art and architecture tours of this respected independent library. They also offer tours for members should you be so fortunate.
Boston Harborfest – Walking tours are among the many events of Boston’s Independence Day celebration, including special Boston By Foot offerings.
Boston Harborwalk – A self-guided walk along Boston’s waterfront. Check the calendar for tours and  special events in the spring and summer.
Boston Movie Tours – Tinseltown comes to the Hub in this tour of film locations.
Boston National Historical Park – Tours of the Freedom Trail and Charlestown Navy Yard led by National Park Service Rangers.
Boston Nature Center – Birding tours, nature walks, and hikes in the heart of the city.
Boston Public Library – Regular art and architecture tours of the oldest municipal library in the US.
The Boston Spirits Walking Tour – A spooky walking tour focusing on Boston’s ghost stories.
Boston Town Crier – Freedom Trail tours led by character interpreters of James Otis and Benjamin Franklin.
Boston Women’s Heritage Trail – Nine self-guided walks exploring women’s history in Boston.
Boston Your Way – Hire a private guide for a customizable tour (I wonder if they’re hiring).
Cambridge Historical Society – The CHS events calendar currently includes a garden tour and historic house tours.
Discover Roxbury – Tours and events highlight the diversity of this historic neighborhood.
Fenway Park – Go behind the scenes at the home of the Boston Red Sox, the oldest and smallest ballpark in Major League Baseball.
Forest Hills Cemetery – Boston’s hidden gem is full of history, art, and architecture, all of which is illuminated by a good tour guide (read about a great tour we took in 2007).
Franklin Park Coalition – A self-guided tour, trails, and special events throughout the year in the “gem” of the Emerald Necklace.
Freedom Trail Tours – You can follow the red line on your own or let a costumed guide show you the way with 3 different 90-minute tours provided by the Freedom Trail Foundation.
Gibson House Museum – If you’re admiring the Victorian architecture of Back Bay and want to see a house interior, stop in here for a tour.
Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway Society – Explore the new public space replacing the elevated Central Artery with special tours supported by Boston By Foot and other special events.
Harvard Campus Tour – Free student-led tours of the Harvard University campus.
Haunted Boston – 90 minute ghost tours of Boston.  Ask for Gretchen.
Historic New England – The HNE calendar offers neighborhood and historic property tours in Boston and throughout New England.
Irish Heritage Trail – A self-guided walk with guided tours in the works.
Learn English in Boston – Art and architecture tours of Boston for ESL students.
Lessons on Liberty – Costumed historical interpreters teach about Revolutionary Boston history along the Freedom Trail
Mass Bay Railroad Enthusiasts – Quarry to wharf tours of the remains of the granite railway in Quincy and Milton (part van, part walking tour).
MIT Campus Tour – Learn about the innovative architecture by world-renown architects that speckle the MIT campus.
Middlesex Fells – Check the calendar for special hikes or join the regular Babes in the Woods walks for parents and children.
Museum of Fine Arts – Regular free guided tours of the galleries (with museum admission) plus art & architecture tours outside of the museum.
The Nichols House Museum – If you’re admiring the Federal architecture of Beacon Hill and want to see a house interior, stop in here for a tour.
North End Secret Tour – Tours of Boston’s oldest neighborhood lead by a local resident.
The Path to Independence – Character interpreters offer a first-person historical perspective of the Freedom Trail.
Phantoms of Olde Cambridge -The ghosties of Harvard Square get their own tour.
Photowalks – Walking tours combined with instruction in photography on four different routes.
Paul Revere’s North End Walking Tour – An experienced guide from the Paul Revere House leads tours of the North End in early July.
South End Historical Society – An Annual House Tour is offered in October.
Unofficial Tours Present Harvard University – Fun tours of America’s first college.

Urban Adventours – Okay not a walking tour, but still cool environmentally-friendly and exciting bicycle tours of Boston.
Victorian Society in America/New England Chapter – Tours and talks of the Victorian heritage in Boston and its suburbs
WalkBoston – Boston’s walking advocacy group offers regular walks around the city.
Walking Tours of Historic Boston – Families and groups can book tours of Boston’s historic center lead by a children’s book author.
Watson Adventures Scavenger Hunts – A unique spin on the walking tour where participants gather together in teams to solve questions and puzzles.

Lincoln — Darwin — 200!

I’ve been looking forward to this day for some time as it is the 200th anniversary of the birth of two of the most influential people of the 19th Century.  Abraham Lincoln and Charles Darwin were both born on February 12, 1809.  In addition to a shared birth date, influence, and lots of controversy, Lincoln & Darwin share a sense of humility according to Robert McHenry of the Britannica blog

“Darwin, we might say, believed in the power of the human intellect; and at the same time he acknowledged its weaknesses. Lincoln was only too aware of the human capacity for sin; and at the same time he sought to prevail over it through forgiveness. Is it too trite, in this so sophisticated age of doubt and irony, to note simply that each man did the work he found himself called to, and did it with unequalled grace? Can we set aside the suspicion that we, most of us, are not up to their example and instead rejoice that they were of our species?”

They also both rocked the chin hair:

Millard Fillmore’s Bathtub lists some more coincidences between the two men.  Adam Gopnik wrote a book about both men called Angels and Ages which I’ll have to read for next year’s Lincoln-Darwin Day book.

Speaking of books, today I began reading Lincoln at Gettysburg by Gary Wills and I ‘m already learning much about Lincoln’s most famous speech at the consecration of the Gettysburg National Cemetery.  Meanwhile, school children across the nation simultaneously recited The Gettysburg Address this morning.

Previous Lincoln-related books I’ve read include:

Looking for more to read about Lincoln check out Six More Books about Lincoln from The Christian Science Monitor and reading recommendations for all ages from School Library Journal.

While I don’t make a special effort to read books about Darwin each year, here’s my Darwinian readings:

One can also read the Complete Works of Charles Darwin Online.

Don’t feel like reading?  Listen to some great podcasts:

For more on Abraham Lincoln:

For more on Charles Darwin:

The Lincoln Cent was introduced to commemorate the centennial of Lincoln’s birth, so today is also the 100th anniversary of the Lincoln Cent.  Let’s hope they don’t stop making cents.

Finally, here’s a cool YouTube video that claims to show Every Known Photo of Abraham Lincoln:

Previously:

Meme: Dewey Decimal Classification Name, plus Blog Analyzers

Via Phil Bradley, a quiz to convert your name into a Dewey Decimal Classification class.

Liam Sullivan’s Dewey Decimal Section: 002 The book

Class:
000 Computer Science, Information & General Works

Contains:
Encyclopedias, magazines, journals and books with quotations.

What it says about you:
You are very informative and up to date. You’re working on living in the here and now, not the past. You go through a lot of changes. When you make a decision you can be very sure of yourself, maybe even stubborn, but your friends appreciate your honesty and resolve.

Find your Dewey Decimal Section at Spacefem.com

As an extra added bonus to this rather lazy post, Random Musings from the Desert posts links to various blog analyzers!

According to Typealyzer, this blog is:

ENTP – The Visionaries
The charming and trend savvy type. They are especially attuned to the big picture and anticipate trends. They often have sophisticated language skills and come across as witty and social. At the end of the day, however, they are pragmatic decision makers and have a good analytical abilitity.

They enjoy work that lets them use their cleverness, great communication skills and knack for new exciting ventures. They have to look out not to become quitters, since they easily get bored when the creative exciting start-up phase is over.

I’ve taken the Myers-Briggs test myself and always come out INFP, so my blog is more extroverted than I am.  Of course that text above is rather laughable.

GenderAnalyzer says:

We think http://www.othemts.wordpress.com is written by a man (73%)

Must be all the stuff I write about beer, baseball, farts, films with lots of ‘splosions, and nekkid jello wrestling.

Finally, the analyzer I fear the most, The Blog Readability Test:

blog readability test

TV Reviews

Ouch!

With a little Googlin’, I found one more blog analysis tool, How Much is Your Blog Worth?


My blog is worth $7,903.56.
How much is your blog worth?

That’s what I get for a high school education.

Previously:

Get out the Vote

Tomorrow is Election Day.  While the Presidential Election is well-publicized, if you’re like me you may find it hard to find information on the other elections and ballot-initiatives that are taking place.  Here are a few resources I’ve found and I hope this may help any readers in making informed decisions when voting.

  • Imagine Election – for Masachusetts voters, creates a web version of what your ballot will look like in your district.
  • Elections Division – the Commonwealth of Massachusetts election website, more comprehensive but less user-friendly than Imagine Election.
  • The Swiss Army Librarian recommended both of the above resources in a great post that explains the ballot in the way a librarian helps a patron.
  • 2008 Ballot Guide – Boston.com’s summary of the 3 ballot questions facing Massachusetts voters.
  • Ballotopedia – a wiki for ballot measures nationwide.
  • League of Women Voters – always a good organization for information on elections.
  • Protect My Vote – resources for what to do if you’re not allowed to vote or think your vote may not be counted.

Also, f you’re voting in Boston, bring some canned food to help the poor!

I personally believe that local government has a great influence on our daily lives and communities, perhaps even greater than the influence of the President, so please take some time to researche the candidates and issues, and then vote!

Link of the Day Reaches 500

Today I posted my 500th link in my link of the day series on delicious.  The story that gets the honor is this article about Harvard refusing Googles terms for book scanning in hopes of preserving open access to the scanned works.   I started Link of the Day on February 25th as a cleaner and easier way of sharing news articles and blog posts than my previous method of making posts here.  If you read in RSS, I remind you to stop by the Panorama of the Mountains blog to check out the delicious links in the sidebar.  You may also subscribe to my delicious feed at http://delicious.com/Othemts.

Economics

It’s amazing what a major fiscal crisis can do to you.  I’ve basically have no interest in economics.  In fact I even managed to weasel myself out of the required economics course in High School by taking a special course in Japanese taught by a college professor (that worked out well as I know something like five words in Japanese).

I find it surprising that quite accidentally I find myself reading and listening to economics news pretty much on a daily basis.  Here’s what I’m checking out:

So if you’re trying to figure out what’s going in our global financial system, check these out.

Edit on Sep. 25th:

Hah!  This guy could be me:

Boston Walking Tours

Spring is sprung, so it is a good time to get out and take a walking tour of Boston where one can learn about history, architecture, art, nature, society, or just get some fresh air. Since I love walking tours, I decided to pull together a list of the various tours available in Boston and neighboring communities. The two organizations listed below have primacy because I am a volunteer guide for them (don’t let that scare you away, the other guides are great). The rest are listed in alphabetical order. While I’m a fan of walking tours, I don’t tend to have the time to take as many as I like so be aware I only have personal experience with a few of these organizations so don’t consider making the list an endorsement. If you know of any good walking tours in Boston not listed below, I’d love to add them to the list, so please post in the comments.

  • Boston By Foot – Boston’s premier walking tours with 7 regular tours offered daily, tours of the month, and special holiday tours.
  • Jamaica Plain Historical Society -Weekly tours on Saturday mornings of 6 areas in the Eden of America.

  • Appalachian Mountain Club – The Boston Chapter has a Local Walks Committee offering hikes to condition oneself for the mountains, nature walks, and social walks.
  • Arnold Arboretum – Boston’s tree museum offers regular highlight tours and special theme tours. Come back again because the tour changes depending on the season.
  • Audissey Guides – Download a tour narrated by local personalities for your mp3 player.
  • Black Heritage Trail – A tour of African-American history in Boston led by National Park Service guides, or you can take a self-guided tour.
  • Evening Walkers – A Meetup.com group for people who like walking. No narration, just scenery and a chance to meet people.
  • Friends of the Blue Hills – Group hikes and nature walks in the Blue Hills Reservation.
  • Brookline Food Tour – The way to Brookline’s heart is through your stomach.
  • Boston Athenæum – Art and architecture tours of this respected independent library. They also offer tours for members should you be so fortunate. [Suggested by Charles Swift in the comments below].
  • Boston CityWalks – Four regularly scheduled walks and custom tours of Boston and Cambridge [Suggested by Alan in the comments below]
  • Boston Harborfest – Walking tours are among the many events of Boston’s Independence Day celebration, including special Boston By Foot offerings.
  • Boston Harborwalk – A self-guided walk along Boston’s waterfront.
  • Boston Movie Tours – Tinseltown comes to the Hub in this tour of film locations.
  • Boston National Historical Park – Tours of the Freedom Trail and Charlestown Navy Yard led by National Park Service Rangers.
  • Boston Nature Center – Birding tours, nature walks, and hikes in the heart of the city.
  • Boston Public Library – Regular art and architecture tours of the oldest municipal library in the US.
  • The Boston Spirits Walking Tour – A spooky walking tour focusing on Boston’s ghost stories.
  • Boston Town Crier – Freedom Trail tours led by character interpreters of James Otis and Benjamin Franklin.
  • Boston Women’s Heritage Trail – Nine self-guided walks exploring women’s history in Boston.
  • Boston Your Way – Hire a private guide for a customizable tour (I wonder if they’re hiring).
  • Cambridge Historical Society – The CHS events calendar currently includes a garden tour and historic house tours.
  • Discover Roxbury – Arrange a 90 minute tour for school, family, and adult groups of this historic and diverse neighborhood.
  • Fenway Park – Go behind the scenes at the home of the Boston Red Sox, the oldest and smallest ballpark in Major League Baseball.
  • Forest Hills Cemetery – Boston’s hidden gem is full of history, art, and architecture, all of which is illuminated by a good tour guide (read about a great tour we took last fall).
  • Franklin Park Coalition – A self-guided tour, trails, and special events throughout the year in the “gem” of the Emerald Necklace.
  • Freedom Trail Tours – You can follow the red line on your own or let a costumed guide show you the way with 3 different 90-minute tours provided by the Freedom Trail Foundation.
  • Gibson House Museum – If you’re admiring the Victorian architecture of Back Bay and want to see a house interior, stop in here for a tour.
  • Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway Society – Explore the new public space replacing the elevated Central Artery with special tours supported by Boston By Foot.
  • Harvard Campus Tour – Free official tours of the Harvard University campus.
  • Historic New England – The HNE calendar offers neighborhood and historic property tours in Boston and throughout New England.
  • Irish Heritage Trail – A self-guided walk with guided tours in the works.
  • Learn English in Boston – Art and architecture tours of Boston for ESL students.
  • Mass Bay Railroad Enthusiasts – Quarry to wharf tours of the remains of the granite railway in Quincy and Milton (part van, part walking tour).
  • MIT Campus Tour – Learn about the innovative architecture by world-renown architects that speckle the MIT campus.
  • Middlesex Fells – Check the calendar for special hikes or join the regular Babes in the Woods walks for parents and children.
  • Museum of Fine Arts – Regular free guided tours of the galleries (with museum admission) plus art & architecture tours outside of the museum.
  • The Nichols House Museum – If you’re admiring the Federal architecture of Beacon Hill and want to see a house interior, stop in here for a tour.
  • North End Secret Tour – Tours of Boston’s oldest neighborhood lead by a local resident.
  • The Path to Independence – Character interpreters offer a first-person historical perspective of the Freedom Trail.
  • Phantoms of Olde Cambridge -The ghosties of Harvard Square get their own tour.
  • Photowalks – Walking tours combined with instruction in photography on four different routes.
  • Paul Revere’s North End Walking Tour – An experienced guide from the Paul Revere House leads tours of the North End in early July.
  • South End Historical Society – An Annual House Tour is offered in October.
  • Unofficial Tours Present Harvard University – Fun tours of America’s first college.
  • WalkBoston – Boston’s walking advocacy group offers regular walks around the city.
  • Walking Tours of Historic Boston – Families and groups can book tours of Boston’s historic center lead by a children’s book author.
  • Watson Adventures Scavenger Hunts – A unique spin on the walking tour where participants gather together in teams to solve questions and puzzles.
  • Women Artists in the Back Bay – A self-guided walk created by created in partnership by the Boston Women’s Heritage Trail and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, with the support of the City of Boston, the Boston Women’s Commission, and the MFA Ladies Committee Associates.
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