Craziness in Cambridge


A few years ago as a I pedaled to work on my daily sojourn to work I would make a mental note of some of the more egregious behavior of my fellow cyclists and motorists on the road. I would award them the “Bad Bicyclist of the Day Award” or the “Dangerous Driver Du Jour…

I’m not sure if I count


According to Outsidein.com and reported on Boston.com, Boston is the bloggiest city in the US. I’m not sure if this includes the metro area or just Boston proper. If the latter, I don’t count because I don’t live in the city of Boston (yet). I think it would be cool if the features of social…

Simpsonized


Everyone’s doing it, so why not me. Here’s my Springfield counterpart: I just didn’t look right without a chin, so I added a chin, but it looks more like a goiter. I’m not sure which looks worse. Any how you can try this cheezy, fast-food chain commercial tie-in at Simpsonize Me.

Burning of the Ursuline Convent In Charlestown


Today is the anniversary of a rather ignominious date in Boston.  An anti-Irish, anti-Catholic, anti-immigrant mob vented their rage by burning down and Ursuline convent that stood on Ploughed Hill in Charlestown.  Today the hill’s been torn down and the site of the convent is now within the boundaries of Somerville near the site of…

Book Review: Severance by Robert Olen Butler


This odd little book is more a collection of thoughts than stories.  Severance by Robert Olen Butler is inspired by two quotes: After careful study and due deliberation it is my opinion the head remains conscious for one minute and a half after decapitation. – Dr. Dassy D’Estaing, 1883 In a heightened state of emotion,…

Clare


In a very powerful scene in Roberto Rosellini’s The Flowers of St. Francis, Clare comes to visit Francis and all the friars are filled with joy about the meeting of these two living saints. It’s a scene in which two people who love each very much come together in the serenity and joy of the…

Book Review: The Architecture of Happiness


The Architecture of Happiness (2006) by Alain de Botton is as much a philosophy book as it is a treatise on architecture. Instead of the who, what and how, this book explores the rarely asked why of architecture. In a short, lyrical work that is a delight to read, de Botton questions why some types…

Book Review: 1776 by David McCullough


This week I listened to another good book while performing mundane tasks at work: 1776 (2005) by David McCullough.  Since the book was read by the author in his commanding baritone, it was a bit like having a Ken Burns’ film in my ears. The book named for the most famous year in American history…

Views on Immigration


The debate over immigration is a major topic this summer.  I’ve been collecting articles about immigration the past couple of months and here are some of the many views expressed on the issue. Previous post on this issue. A Legal and Economical View: Why restrict immigration at all? By Becky Akers and Donald J. Boudreaux…

Friday Sillies: Rock, Paper, Scissors


I’ve featured Found Magazine previously in Friday Sillies but today’s Find of the Day is so funny I had to share it.  The writer has a good point about paper. Besides, I couldn’t find anything else good and silly to post today.

Richard Harris Film Festival


I’ve been a fan of the Irish actor Richard Harris (1930-2002) ever since I so him perform as King Arthur in Camelot (1982), a film of a stage performance show on TV when I was a kid (not to be confused with the 1967 film in which Harris also stars that is not as good)….

Book Review: Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return


Marjane Satrapi returns with another harrowing, introspective, and funny graphic memoir in Persepolis 2: The Story of a Return (2004). Picking up where Persepolis left off, one can forget any preconceived notions of the difficulties of adolescence. Sure Marji is facing mood swings, sudden changes in her body and unpopularity among her peers. She’s also…

Book Review: Michael Tolliver Lives


This is “my favorite book series” week.  Armistead Maupin returns to familiar ground with Michael Tolliver Lives (2007), catching up with the characters from his Tales of the City series.  The differences here are that while Tales centered around Mary Ann Singleton — starting with her arrival in San Francisco and ending with her departure…

Book Review: First Among Sequels


Thursday Next, the heroine of my favorite series of books by Welsh author Jasper Fforde is back in First Among Sequels (2007), the fifth in the series.  The story picks up 14 years after the end of Something’s Rotten and Spec-Op’s has been shut down by the bureaucracy so Thursday and her colleagues run it…

Feast of the Transfiguration


Today is the Feast of the Transfiguration, based on a story related in all the synoptic Gospels: Matthew, Luke, and Mark. Jesus climbs Mount Tabor with Peter, John, and James to pray. While there he is transfigured, his face and appearance change, and Moses and Elijah appear to be speaking with him. This leads to…

Hyperactive Hyperlinks


Here’s another post that’s nothing more than a collection of links, many of them silly, the majority introduced to me by Metafilter. Abandoned But Not Forgotten is a collection of photos of abandoned, historical, and unusual locations from around the world. Beware of the slow loading vintage web design (somewhat apropos to the topic actually)…

On Facebook Now


I’m pretending to be a young, connected hipster by participating in Facebook. I’ve added a WordPress application in hopes of drawing more attention to Panorama of the Mountains. The application also allows me to make posts to WordPress from within Facebook for whatever reason. So I’m trying it out. Anyhow, I still don’t really know…

Finally!


Some news that acknowledges that the internet is not death to libraries as we know it! Good Circulation by Eric Moskovitz, Boston Globe, July 29, 2007. Library directors remember the talk, not long ago, of technology rendering libraries obsolete. But statistics show that the opposite has occurred. Over the past decade, library circulation has climbed,…

Edward Hopper at the MFA


Tonight Susan and I visited the Boston Museum of Fine Arts for the Edward Hopper exhibition. It was a good retrospective of the 20th Century artist known for iconic works such as Nighthawks. Oddly, the Nighthawks on display must have been a knockoff because it didn’t have James Dean, Marilyn Monroe, and Elvis in it….

I saw the Hood Blimp last night


…from the Anderson Bridge. It looked a lot closer in real life. For more on this skybound Boston phenomenon, visit Chronicles of the Hood Blimp. For older airships, check out Shorpy’s Zeppelins and Blimps gallery.