Book Review: The Union of Their Dreams by Miriam Pawel


Author: Miriam Pawel
Title: The Union of Their Dreams: Power, Hope, and Struggle in Cesar Chávez’s Farm Worker Movement
Publication Info: Bloomsbury Press (2009)
ISBN: 1596914602

Summary/Review:

I’ve never known much about Cesar Chávez and the United Farm Worker’s union so I was pleased to receive a free copy of this book from the Library Thing Early Reviewers program.  The book is not about Chávez directly although his presence hovers over the events covered in this book for both good and ill.  Instead Pawel focuses on the stories of nine individuals who dedicated their lives to the farm worker movement – field hands, organizers, lawyers and a ministers. Their overlapping stories offer a glimpse into the movement’s rise and fall from the 1960s to the 1980s.

At first it’s an inspiring story of boycotts, strikes and union elections where the union prevails against the growers (and their Teamster thugs) as well as scoring legislative victories.  Chávez becomes a national hero for his inspiration, non-violent leadership.  Unfortunately like many organizations the UFW is torn apart by internal conflicts and Chávez only exacerbates the problems.    Pawel details how these close friend and colleagues of Chávez see him becoming increasingly paranoid, micromanaging and megalomaniac, purging the union of people on specious grounds and making life miserable for those who remain.

This book is ultimately heartbreaking but there are glimpses of hope nevertheless.  It’s inspiring that despite all the difficulties these nine people dedicated themselves to an ideal and a cause.  While shattering the myth of Chávez the hero, this book still illustrates the good that can be done by ordinary people working for social justice.

Recommended books: The Long Loneliness by Dorothy Day, We Can’t Eat Prestige: The Women Who Organized Harvard by John Hoerr, and Bearing the Cross: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference by David J. Garrow
Rating: ***

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