JP A to Z: T is for Three-Decker #AtoZChallenge #JamaicaPlain


T is for Three-Decker

The three-decker (sometimes called triple-decker) is a type of apartment building that is prominent in eastern Massachusetts but rarely found elsewhere.  It’s a simple design in which each of the three floors is a single apartment.  These were built primarily from 1870s to the 1920s as an economical way of housing lots of immigrant workers, but having more light and fresh air than row houses.

I’ve lived on the top floor of a three-decker for 18 years now, first in Somerville, now in JP.  Because the floorplan is virtually identical, I find myself having memories of things happening in this house and then realizing that they happened in the previous house.  Most three-deckers are pretty simple, unadorned wood-frame structures.  But on Brookside Street in Jamaica Plain there are a series of three-deckers with decorative elements of Victorian architecture styles known as The Seven Sisters (sadly, one of them burnt down so only Six Sisters survive).

Three Deckers
Some of the surviving Seven Sisters.

Post for “T” in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge.

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4 thoughts on “JP A to Z: T is for Three-Decker #AtoZChallenge #JamaicaPlain

  1. Top floor is key. No one banging around overhead. Buffalo has a lot of “double-deckers” and I never rented on the lower level. No way. It’s also a safety thing, especially in Buffalo.

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    1. I just have to constantly remind my kids to stop stomping their feet / jumping / dropping things / sliding toys along the uncarpeted floors. We’re terrible usptairs neighbors.

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