Podcasts of the Week Ending June 6


Coronavirus Daily

:: The Cost Of Being “Essential”

Essential workers are suffering economically and physically as a result of the COVID-19 Pandemic.

::A Looming Financial Meltdown For America’s Schools

The COVID-19 is exacerbating the crisis of underfunded public schools.

Fresh Air

:: Rethinking The Migration Of All Living Things

From “invasive species” to “invasions of immigrants,” the movement of living beings are frequently decried for plants, animals, and humans, but science writer Sonia Shah proposes they are following a biological need.

:: Why GOP Leaders Back Trump’s ‘Proto-Authoritarian Cult’

Trump is bringing us closer and closer to a full-fascist state and has been able to do so because Republican officials have backed him all the way even when he goes against their purported beliefs.

Memory Palace :: A Park

A history of the importance of Lafayette Square in Washington, DC, scene of Trump’s terrifying display of authoritarian violence on peaceful protesters this week.

What Next :: A History of Violent Protest

The history of structural change in America all the way back to colonial times is based on violent protest.


Movie Review: Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey (1991)


Title: Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey
Release Date: July 19, 1991
Director: Pete Hewitt
Production Company: Nelson Entertainment | Interscope Communications
Summary/Review:

This sequel to Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure got good reviews at the time of its release but I never got around to watching it until now. Wisely, the filmmakers went for a plotline that didn’t rehash the gags of the first movie.  Bizarrely, they instead made a movie that is partially a parody of Bergman’s The Seventh Seal.

Bill & Ted are high school graduates with their own apartment, hoping to marry their “chaste” medieval girlfriends. In the intervening years, they appear to have become more alternative than metal (Ted in particular is looking grunge and the band Primus makes an appearance). In the future utopia built on Bill & Ted’s music, a rebel gym teacher Chuck De Nomolos (Joss Ackland) sends back evil Bill & Ted robots to kill the real Bill & Ted. Thus begins the Bogus Journey where Bill & Ted must outwit Death (William Sadler) in various board games, travel to Hell and Heaven, and return to Earth to win a Battle of the Bands.

Like its predecessor, the movie is full or cornball gags that grow increasingly weird while also having a wholesome, feel-good sheen. Sadler’s Death is particularly a hilarious scene-stealer and unexpected sidekick.

Rating: ***1/2