Podcasts of the Week Ending May 9


What Next

How Extremists Capitalized on the Pandemic – White nationalists are strategically using this crisis to advance their hateful goals.

A Biden Accuser on the Latest Biden Allegation – Despite the Democratic Party’s claim to be pro-women, their presumptive nominee has a long history of sexual harassment allegations.  This is a big problem.

99% Invisible :: The Natural Experiment

Isolating during the pandemic sucks, but it’s provided scientists the conditions for scientific research not possible during normal levels of activity, such as: air pollution, boredom, vaccination, and redesigning cities for people not cars.

This Day in Esoteric Public History :: Coya Come Home

An historical event I’ve never heard of before involves Coya Knutson, the first woman elected to Congress from Minnesota (in 1955), and the letter allegedly written by her estranged husband telling her to come home.  Her election opponent used this scandal to win the next election.

Code Switch :: What Does ‘Hood Feminism’ Mean For A Pandemic?

Author Mikki Kendall talks about race, feminism and COVID-19 and the divide between mainstream, white feminism and the greater goals of women of color.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Appearances in 2020

Podcasts of the Week Ending May 2nd


Futility Closet :: Lennie Gwyther

The true story of a nine-year-old boy who made a solo 1000-km journey in 1932 to witness the opening of the Sydney Harbor Bridge.

99% Invisible :: The Smell of Concrete After Rain

The story of mid-century, concrete architecture (Brutalism) inflicted upon our world’s cities.

What Next :: We’re Gonna Need a Bigger Stimulus

The truth that everyone except conservative politicians knows to be trues.

Fresh Air :: Who’s Benefiting From The Coronavirus Economic Relief Package?

Meanwhile, those same conservative politicians are ensuring that the gravy train is pulling up to the mansions of America’s wealthiest.


 

 

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Appearances in 2020

Podcasts of the Week Ending April 11


99% Invisible :: Wipe Out

Worth it’s weight in gold, toilet paper is on peoples’ minds these days.  But does it even need to exist.

 

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Appearances in 2020

Podcasts of the Week Ending March 14


Scientific American :: Coronavirus Hot Zone: The View from the U.S. Epicenter

Insightful reporting from Washington during the early days of the coronavirus outbreak.

99% Invisible :: Map Quests: Political, Physical and Digital

I love maps and the curious things that they can show us.

What Next :: If Prisoners Could Vote

Felony disenfranchisement has denied millions of American their right to vote. Interviews with prisoners gets their opinion on voting and their insights into politics.


Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Appearances in 2020

Podcasts of the Week Ending February 8


Anthropocene Reviewed :: Works of Art by Agnes Martin and Hiroyuki Doi

It’s not often that visual art can be made so poignant in an audio medium.

LeVar Burton Reads :: “Tidelne” by Elizabeth Baer

This postapocalyptic story of a bottle robot and a orphan boy made me weep.

Decoder Ring :: The Stowe-Byron Controversy

Long before Twitter, Harriet Beecher Stowe drew out the cancel culture for spreading the (most likely true) story of Lord Byron’s incestuous relationship.

99% Invisible :: Missing the Bus

Forget about autonomous cars and the hyperloop.  The best way of moving people around in big numbers is already here: the bus.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Appearances in 2020

Podcasts of the Week Ending December 7


99% Invisible :: The Infantorium

Disneyland and Epcot are famous for demonstrating technology in order to provide a vision of the future.  But in the early 1900s the technology at American amusement parks and carnivals was incubators for premature babies.  This podcast explains how it came to be that parents of premature babies had to bring their children to amusement parks rather than hospitals.

Futility Closet :: A Kidnapped Painting

The story of the theft of Goya’s portrait of the Duke of Wellington from London’s National Gallery is unexpectedly amusing.

Twenty Thousand Hertz :: Historically Speaking

The history of language and how it shapes cultures and individual identities.

Running tally of 2019 Podcast of the Week appearances:

Podcasts of the Week Ending October 19


Dolly Parton’s America :: Sad Ass Songs

This is a new podcast about possibly America’s most beloved living person, Dolly Parton. The debut podcast focuses on issues ranging from murder ballads to feminism.

99% Invisible :: Unsure Footing

The story of how soccer changed the backpass rule leading immediately to an embarrassing period for goalkeepers, but ultimately to a more exciting game.

Hub History :: Race Over Party

The history of African American politics in Boston in the late 19th century.

This American Life :: We Come From Small Places

The immigrant experience explored through stories from the Labor Day Carnival and the West Indian American Day Parade in Brooklyn.


Running tally of 2019 Podcast of the Week appearances:

Podcasts of the Week Ending October 5th


99% Invisible :: The Help-Yourself City

A discussion of “Informal Urbanism,” the practice of ordinary people making changes to the city outside the legal and regulatory framework, either for needed improvements to the community or for self-interest.

Code Switch :: Political Prisoners

One of the many injustices of mass incarceration is “prison gerrymandering,” which results from prison being counted by the census and districting as part of the population where they’re incarcerated rather than their prior permanent address.  The non-prison population of the districts, often a small minority, are able to elect representatives who have no interest in representing the prisoners in their constituency.

Sound Opinions :: Fugazi’s Repeater

A breakdown of the Washington hardcore punk band’s seminal 1990 album, including interviews with the great Ian MacKaye.

The War on Cars :: The Problem with Public Meetings

Are public meetings the most democratic and effective way of finding common ground on the use of shared urban spaces?  Probably not.  This episode breaks down the problems of public meetings through the lens of a town hall forum in Brooklyn.

Running tally of 2019 Podcast of the Week appearances:

Podcasts of the Week Ending August 23


99% Invisible Peace Lines

A history of the barriers built between Catholic Nationalist and Protestant Unionist communities in Northern Ireland that still remain over 20 years after the peace agreement that ended The Troubles.

The War on Cars Barcelona’s Superblocks with David Roberts of Vox

A discussion of the Superilla, or superblock, plan in Barcelona to reclaim urban space from motor vehicles.

Running tally of 2019 Podcast of the Week appearances:

Podcasts of the Week Ending July 27


BackStory :: Moon, Man, and Myths

The History Guys commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing with an interview with flight director Gene Kranz, among other things.

Code Switch :: Chicago’s Red Summer

Another anniversary, of a grim sort, of the race riots 100 years ago in Chicago and other American cities that targeted African American soldiers returning from the World War among others.

Fresh Air :: 50th Anniversary of the Moon Landing

This podcast includes interviews with astronauts Michael Collins and Alan Shepherd as well as test pilot Chuck Yeager.

Hub History  :: The Cessna Strafer

A bizarre incident in 1989 when a man who’d just murdered his wife took to the air in a small airplane and fired an assault rifle at people on the ground in Boston.  This seems like a very serious crime, and yet I only learned about it a few years ago, even though I was alive and living in an adjacent state at the time.

99% Invisible :: Invisible Women

An interview with Caroline Criado Perez, author of Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men, on how women are ignored in the design of just about everything, and the dangerous effects of this bias.

On the Media :: What, Me Worry?

Mad Magazine, the satire magazine enjoyed by decades of children going back to the 1950s, is going out of print.  Journalist Jeet Heer talks about the magazines importance and influence.

Running tally of 2019 Podcast of the Week appearances: