Posts Tagged ‘Art’

Photopost: A Visit to the MFA, part two

On my second visit to the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, I began a slow and studious exploration of the Art of the Ancient World.  I had trouble making a connection with the art at first as there seemed to be no story linking them together.  Galleries adjacent to one another held Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek, and Roman art.  Thousands of years, and thousands of miles, and thousands of cultures side by side.  But I did make a connection looking at the sculptures of ancient people and gazing into their eyes.  When face to face with a person it is hard to maintain eye contact, but here I could look into the eyes of humans who lived millennia ago and they had so much to say.  One Greek sculpture, Woman from a funerary monument, almost looked alive in her expression of grief.

To mix things up, I moved on to the Contemporary Art collections. Ancient art memorialized people and honored gods, but contemporary art asks you questions.  The descriptions, the writing on the wall, even the art itself ask questions.  Art here is more a reflection of the viewer, literally in the case of Untitled (Shu-red).  I spent more time that I should be willing to admit trying to take a selfie in its lacquered surface and finding myself delightfully disoriented.  Art also asks the tough questions, like “Why?” and “How can we let this happen?”  A sobering gallery collects artists’ responses to the 2011 earthquake in Japan.  The photographs and film here capture more pain and poignancy than any other news report.

There’s still much more to see and experience at the MFA, so I hope I return soon.


Photopost: As If It Were Already Here

On a gorgeous Sunday afternoon in Boston, my family and I visited the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway to experience the monumental work of art As If It Were Already Here by Janet Echelman.  At first it felt underwhelming, pretty, but smaller than expected.  But as I walked under and around the sculpture I couldn’t help but notice how it interacts with sun and sky, buildings and trees, always changing even with a small change of perspective.  So I took a ton of pictures.  You can see them below, but definitely check it out in person.

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Photopost: Getting Dizzy With Izzy

I made another first time in a long time visit to a Boston institution with a day out at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.  Unlike the Museum of Fine Arts, there is only one work of art at the Gardner Museum, a collaboration of Mrs. Gardner and thousands of painters, sculptors, designers, architects, and gardeners.  This was my first visit since the opening of the new Renzo Piano wing, which is impressive, but seems mostly a utilitarian annex to the historic museum.  It was also the first time I’ve been to the museum since photography is allowed, although only of the courtyard on the main level.  Plenty of scofflaws took photos from the upper levels too, but were only stopped by the guards when using flash.  I followed Mrs. Gardner’s preference of immersing myself in the art and beauty.

Photopost: A Visit to the MFA, part one

For the first time in several years, I have a membership to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.  I’m working on putting it to use by visiting the Museum and methodically but casually working my way through the galleries absorbing the art on display and sharing what I learn.

On a recent Sunday afternoon, I explored the third floor, home to the Museum’s collection of 20th-century art.  It is a quiet place in the museum even on a busy weekend.  A man pushing his sleeping child in a stroller along a window-lined corridor told me “This is the best part of the museum!”

I was impressed particularly by the MFA’s strong collections of 20th Century Art but African-American artists, Boston-area artists, and some who are both. Some artists I learned about for the first time that I’m really drawn to are Eldzier Cortor, Allan Rohan Crite, and Charles Sheeler.  In addition to a variety of modern paintings, sculpture and decorative arts, the third floor hosts an excellent exhibit of photography of Gordon Parks, who returned to his home town of  Fort Scott, Kansas for a photo essay in 1950.

Stopped for a selfie en route to the third floor.

El Fuego by José Clemente Orozco

Cercle du Blé by Matta (Roberto Sebastián Matta Echaurren)


Room No. V by Eldzier Cortor

Pigeons by John Sloan.

Big Wind In Georgia by Hale Woodruff

Room in Brooklyn by Edward Hopper


Old Brooklyn Bridge by Joseph Stella

Art Deco clocks.

The Pool Game by Jacob Lawrence

The Door by David Aronson

Venus by Fernando Botero

Deer’s Skull with Pedernal by Georgia O’Keefe

New England Irrelevancies by Charles Sheeler

The Arrangement of Things by Ross Bleckner with an appreciator of fine art.

Book Review: The Gardner Heist by Ulrish Boser

Author: Ulrich Boser
Title: The Gardner Heist: The True Story of the World’s Largest Unsolved Art Theft
Publication Info: Smithsonian (2009)
ISBN: 0061451835


For the 20th anniversary of the theft of 13 priceless art works from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, I read this book detailing the heist. The first chapter gives a blow-by-blow of all the known details of the heist itself in the early-morning hours of March 17, 1990.  Next, Boser introduces Harold Smith, an art detective who dedicates many of the remaining years of his life gathering clues and following leads about the heist.  After Smith dies in 2005, Boser himself picks up Smith’s casebook and begins immersing himself in the case to the point of obsession.  The trail of the crime leads Boser to look into various Boston underworld characters such as a noted art thief, Whitey Bulger and his mob cronies, and even the Irish Republican Army.  At one point the obsession gets ridiculous as Boser visits a town in Ireland thinking he’ll be able to pick Bulger off the street.  In the end, there’s no solution yet for the mystery of missing art, but Boser gives some interesting insights into how art theft is perpetrated and how that art may hopefully be returned.

Recommended booksDead Certainties : Unwarranted Speculations by Simon Schama, Legends of Winter Hill: Cops, Con Men, and Joe McCain, the Last Real Detective by Jay Atkinson, and  Black Mass: The True Story of an Unholy Alliance Between the FBI and the Irish Mob by Dick Lehr

Rating: ***1/2

Book Review: The Art of Travel by Alain De Botton

Author: Alain De Botton
Title: The Art of Travel
Publication Info: Recorded Books, LLC (2002), Audio CD
ISBN: 1402545096

Previously Read by Same Author: The Architecture of Happiness


This book reflects on travel focusing on the little things such as the novelty of the commonplace in a new place, disorientation, the boredom of travel, and even ponders whether travel for pleasure is even a necessity.  Along the way he shows travel through the eyes of various artists: Van Gogh, Wordsworth, Flauber, Von Humboldt and others.  He even details how artists create the vision we have of the destinations we wish to visit.  This is all written in the intellectual vein of someone who attends a literary salon, so  if that’s not your thing, you won’t like this book.  I found it brain-teasingly good, but I think that de Botton is meant to be read more than heard so I don’t recommend the audiobook.

Rating: ***

Mission: Boston

With the first day of spring upon us and Boston officially thawing out, it’s time to get out and do something!  There are many things to do and sites to see right near home that I always find a way to procrastinate, some for several years running now.   Here are ten things to do in metro-Boston that I’ve never done before that I would like to do between now and Thanksgiving.

  1. Finally visit The Museum of Bad Art in Dedham
  2. Tour an old house like the Loring-Greenough House in JP, the Gibson House Museum in Back Bay,  the Nichols House Museum in North End, the Shirley Eustis House in Roxbury and/or the oldest of them all the James Blake House of Dorchester.
  3. Walk through the Mapparium at the Mary Baker Eddy Library.
  4. Check out the new Institute of Contemporary Art.
  5. Check out the view from the observation deck on the Customs House tower.
  6. Walk the African-American Heritage Trail.
  7. Get back to nature at the Boston Nature Center. (completed 5/25/09)
  8. Take in a vintage baseball game, preferably on Georges Island.
  9. Sample the beers at the Samuel Adams Brewery Tour.
  10. Commune with the fuzzy pigs at Drumlin Farm. (completed 8/26/09)

Of course, I’d like to get out of town and do some things outside of Boston as well.  Here are five things in greater New England that I’ve never done before that I’d like to do in the same time period:

  1. Watch the second largest St. Patrick’s  Parade in America in Holyoke, MA. (completed 3/22/09)
  2. Journey through a world of art and culture at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, MA
  3. Get my public transit geek on at the Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, ME (completed 6/21/09)
  4. Visit the literary landmarks of Hartford, CT: the Mark Twain & Harriet Beecher Stowe houses
  5. Stroll around historic Providence, RI and perhaps witness WaterFire.

If I do any of these things, I will of course blog about it here.  Come join me if you want to do these things too!


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