Bikes Not Bombs Bike-A-Thon 2017 #BAT2017


Once again I enjoyed riding the Bikes Not Bombs Bike-A-Thon with my kids, Kay and Peter. We rode the family-friendly 10 mile route through Jamaica Plain, Roslindale, West Roxbury, and Brookline.  It felt like the hills were steeper this year, but more likely I’m out of practice, and I borrowed a trailer to carry Kay so that was some extra weight.

Riders, volunteers, and sponsors raised $176,253 for all the good things Bikes Not Bombs does in Boston and international programs in  Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean.  You can still contribute by sponsoring us!

 

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Previous Bike-A-Thon’s: 2011, 2013, 2015 and 2016.

Photopost: A Visit to the MFA, part nine: Matisse, McCloskey, & Botticelli


On my latest visit to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, I visited three special exhibitions of art by three very different artists: Henri Matisse, Robert McCloskey, and Sandro Botticelli.

The Matisse exhibit paired many objects from his studio featured in his art with the art that captured the moods, shapes, and colors of those objects.  The McCloskey exhibit is small but features delightful studies and sketched of illustrations for books such as Make Way for Ducklings, Blueberries for Sal, and Burt Dow: Deep Water Man. The Botticelli exhibit brings together many works of art rarely seen outside of Europe while in charming parochial way also celebrating “Boston Botticelli” by bringing in works from the MFA, Gardner Museum, and Harvard Art Museums.  The exhibit also includes works by Filippo Lippi (Botticelli’s teacher) and Filippino Lippi (Filippo’s son and Botticelli’s student).

Here are some of my favorite works.

Previous visits:

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: W is for Water #atozchallenge


I’m participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge through all of April 2017. Every day (except Sundays), I will be posting a new, original photograph (or photographs) related to the letter of the alphabet.

“W” is for “Water.”

 

The Charles River has appeared in several of my A to Z photographs, so today it plays center stage.

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: O is for Oars #atozchallenge


I’m participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge through all of April 2017. Every day (except Sundays), I will be posting a new, original photograph (or photographs) related to the letter of the alphabet.

“O” is for “Oars”

A familiar scene from the Charles River.

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: I is for Instructions #atozchallenge


I’m participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge through all of April 2017. Every day (except Sundays), I will be posting a new, original photograph (or photographs) related to the letter of the alphabet.

The letter “I” is for “Instructions:”

 

I did.

How does this photo make you feel? Does it tell a story? What technical suggestions would you offer for improving the photograph?

Let me know in the comments!

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: H is for Head #atozchallenge


 

I’m participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge through all of April 2017. Every day (except Sundays), I will be posting a new, original photograph (or photographs) related to the letter of the alphabet.

Today’s letter is H for Head!

 

 

This giant head is named Ines and was sculpted by Jaume Plensa.

How does this photo make you feel? Does it tell a story? What technical suggestions would you offer for improving the photograph?

Let me know in the comments!

Photopost: A Visit to the MFA, part eight


I continued my ongoing quest to visit every gallery in the Museum of Fine Arts by visiting the Art of Asia, Oceania, and Africa wings.  It’s unfortunate that the art of the two most populous continents and some diverse island cultures are all clumped together like that, especially since the MFA boasts having a large collection of Asian arts dating back to the earliest days of the museum.  Nevertheless there was quite a delightful collection of works that had me hopping around geographically as well as through time.  One gallery deliberately mixed contemporary and classical Japanese art in a provocative way.

I also took a 3 masterpieces in 30 minutes tour and got to learn about three family portraits from three different artistic styles – Sargent’s The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit, a folk art portrait from the 1830s, and Steen’s Twelfth-Night Feast.

After these eight visits, I believe I’ve been to every permanent gallery in the museum.  Of course, art on exhibit is changing all the time, so I’ll have to go back and do it again.  Maybe next time I’ll have a theme like art with families or bridges or pets or something like that.

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Previous visits:

Upcoming Protests and Rallies in Boston Area


Spring is here and with it comes lots of opportunities to make your voice heard.

March 30th – Blessed are the Peacemakers: Faithful People Gather to Speak out for Peace – 7-8:30pm at St. Bartholomew’s Church, Cambridge

Join Massachusetts Peace Action’s Faith Community Network on March 30 to connect with other people of faith who are coming together to work toward a more peaceful world through reducing the threat of nuclear weapons and our warfare economy.  We will be joined by a number of honored speakers, including: Mayor Denise Simmons, Rev. Paul Ford, Senior Pastor, Union Baptist Church, and Jim Stewart, Director of First Church UCC shelter

March 31st – Our Revolution Boston Rally – 7-9pm at Orpheum Theater

Partnering with “Raise Up Massachusetts”, Our Revolution is taking the next step to organize an unprecedented grassroots effort in Massachusetts around issues such as $15 minimum wage, paid family medical leave, criminal justice reform, immigrants rights and wage inequality.  These issues and others will be highlighted at a the rally by local activists who will be joined by Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

April 6 – DROP the MIC! Confronting Militarism In Our Communities – 7-9pm at First Baptist Church of Jamaica Plain

Speakers: Maggie Martin and Matt Howard, Iraq Veterans Against the War, Karlene Griffiths Sekou, Black Lives Matter Boston,  and Mike Prokosch, Dorchester People for Peace

April 15 – Tax Day Protest  – 1-4pm at Cambridge Common Park

April 22 – March for Science – Boston – 1-4pm at Boston Common

This Rally for Science celebrates the discovery, understanding, and sharing of scientific knowledge as crucial to the success, health, and safety of the human race. We join together to champion not only science itself, but also publicly funded and publicly communicated scientific knowledge as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity. We unite as a diverse and nonpartisan group to celebrate Boston as a space for scientists and scientific research and to support of five main goals: Communication, Funding, Policy, Literacy, and Improvement.

April 22 – Kids’ March for Science – 1-4pm at Boston Common

The Kid’s March for Science (Boston) celebrates the youngest members of our scientific community. We join together in support of dynamic and inclusive science education for all future scientists and supporters of science. We believe kids should have a voice in the decisions that shape the world they will inherit. Kids are scientists at heart, always observing and asking questions — science is fun and family friendly!

April 29 – March for Climate – 9am-4pm at Boston Common

A sister march to the People’s Climate Mobilization in Washington, DC.  With the 100 days of action and April march, this coalition will leverage their power once again, to resist the Trump administration and corporate leaders’ efforts to thwart or reverse progress towards a more just America.

 

I hope to participate in as many of these as possible.  If there are other events coming up not listed, please let me know in the comments and I will update.

TV Review: The Race Underground (2017)


Title The Race Underground
Release Date: 31 January 2017
Director: Michael Rossi
Summary/Review:

The American Experience documentary adapts a portion of the book by Doug Most relating to Boston’s effort to create America’s first subway.  As a Boston partisan myself, why not leave out the portion of the book about New York City, even if they built a far more extensive subway system very swiftly after Boston’s first tunnel opened?  Kidding aside, it is a dramatic figure focusing on key figures such as Frank J. Sprague, who invented the electric trolley car, and Henry Melville Whitney, who consolidated the trolley lines into the West End Street Railway Company and persuaded city officials to approve the first tunnel.  There are challenges along the way including negative popular opinion, graves of Revolutionary War era soldiers, and an explosion, but the subway is completed and convinces the doubters.  The documentary is well-illustrated with photographs and vintage film, and is a delight to watch.
Rating: ***

 

Boston Protest Against Muslim Ban and Anti-Immigration Orders


Another week, another protest, although it feels as if I should be marching in a demonstration daily.

This time is was the Council on American-Islamic Relations-Massachusetts’ Protest Against the Muslim Ban and Anti-Immigration Orders in Boston’s Copley Square.

Here on the steps of Boston’s most architecturally renown Christian church, Massachusetts’ political leaders and religious leaders of different faith traditions (including my friend Reverend Laura Everett) spoke of our promise to love and defend our Muslim neighbors and welcome immigrants and refugees of all backgrounds.

This all happened steps away from where two immigrant brothers detonated bombs that murdered three and wounded hundreds, purportedly in the defense of Islam.  The 25,000 people who marched today know that banning Muslims and rejecting refugees does nothing to protect us from attacks like the one on Boylston Street, and if anything further fan the flames of hatred.

“Let’s be clear: Donald Trump’s order has nothing to do with security. Little girls who flee murderers are not a threat to the United States. Elderly grandparents in airports are not a threat to the United States.

“No, this order is not about terrorist threats. This order is about religious tests, and the United States does not impose religious tests—period.” – Senator Elizabeth Warren.

Photos from the Boston Women’s March for America


Last Saturday, with my family, church community, numerous friends I met along the way, and around 125,000 other people, I participated in Boston Women’s March for America.

I’ve been First Night and the Fourth of July celebrations in Boston.

I’ve been to the Boston Marathon and Red Sox victory parades.

And I’ve never seen that many people in the same place.

Estimates place attendance around 125,000 people. We were in the back of the crown on Boston Common, and couldn’t hear much of anything from the politicians who addressed the crowd. Once the march began, it was more of a shuffle as everyone was stuck shoulder and shoulder, and could only move an inch at a time.

But none of that mattered because this was also the friendliest crowd I’ve ever seen in Boston too. I mean, Boston is a grumpy place and Bostonians generally don’t react well to sharing their personal space with others.

But on this day we filled the Common and overflowed into surrounding streets. It was awe-inspiring. And while every person had a different sign, a different reason for showing up for the march, I’ve never felt such unity.

Upcoming Protests and Rallies in Boston Area


Here’s a list of gatherings in the Boston area where you can make your voice heard on a variety of issues at risk in our current political environment. Please share the list and attend as many events as you can.

Saturday, January 14th:

Sunday, January 15th:

Monday, January 16th:

Thursday, January 19th

Friday, January 20th

Saturday, January 21st

If you know of any events not listed, let me know and I will update.

Also call or write your members of Congress and Massachusetts state government on the issues that matter to you.

The “We’re His Problem Now” Calling Sheet provides tips, scripts, contact information, and calls to action.

Harpoon UFO Pumpkin


Beer: UFO Pumpkin
Brewer: Harpoon Brewery
Source: Can
Rating:  **** (8.4 of 10)
Comments:

I am fond of Harpoons UnFiltered Offering (UFO).  I am fond of spicy pumpkin beers.  So opening this can of delight made my autumn, beer wise.  It’s a beautiful orange beer with a foamy head.  The aroma is full of spice which also infuses that flavor, balanced with sweet malts.  Delicious!

 

From the same brewery:

Beer Review: Harpoon Flannel Friday


Beer: Flannel Friday
Brewer: Harpoon Brewery
Source: 12 oz. bottle
Rating: ** (6.3 of 10)
Comments: Another autumnal beer, amber in color without much head or carbonation.  The beer offers floral and caramel notes and tastes mildly hoppy with some sweet citrus. Seems like an okay beer for the season, but it doesn’t excite me much.

From the same brewery:

Beer Review: Harpoon Octoberfest


Beer: Octoberfest
Brewer: Harpoon Brewery
Source: Can
Rating: ** (6.7 of 10)
Comments:

A copper-colored beer that pours out with light carbonation and a thick head.  It offers a toffee aroma and a flavor of roasted grain, caramel, and mild hops on the aftertaste.  The head evaporates swiftly making the beer look flat.  It’s drinkable, inoffensive.  A good beer for a crisp autumn day.

Note: I previously reviewed this beer on draft and had a more favorable opinion.

From the Same Brewer:

Vote NO on Massachusetts Question #2, UPDATE


Last night I witnessed the Boston School Committee vote unanimously in favor of a resolution to oppose the Massachusetts ballot question #2 which proposes to expand charter schools in the Commonwealth by 12 every year for perpetuity while offering no additional education funding.  The Boston School Committee is one of 164 school committees (and counting) across Massachusetts who have come out against question #2.  None has come out in favor of it.  While the BSC is appointed by the elected mayor of Boston, the rest of these school committees are directly elected representatives of the people.  They join other elected officials in city councils (including Boston), Senator Elizabeth Warren, the Massachusetts Democratic Party, and even  Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, a strong supporter of charter schools, in voicing the people’s’ opposition to this reckless initiative.  The point is not that charter schools are bad – their value for good or evil is not relevant to this debate – but that the fiscal irresponsibility of introducing 12 new schools each year with no funding will devastate municipal budgets and ultimately harm all children regardless of where they go to school. Please join them in standing up to the big-money interests campaigning for this measure by voting No on #2 on November 8th (and then getting together on November 9th to fight for better funding for all of our schools). Remember to tell your friends and if you want to get more involved you can volunteer with Save our Public Schools and/or make a donation.

Here’s an updated list of articles. opinion pieces, and videos expressing the urgency of voting No on 2. The first post listed is the best, concise summary if you’re short on time, but they’re all worth reading and sharing with your friends and on social media.


 

Photopost: Boston Harbor at Sunset


Last week, my daughter Kay was invited to go on a Pirate Cruise with her friends. My son Peter didn’t want to go on a pirate ship, but he did want to go on a boat, so we rode the ferry from Long Wharf to Charlestown and back. We even passed the pirate ship, and the surprisingly friendly crew just waved instead of board and pillaging the ferry.

Beer Review: Harpoon Trippel


Beer: Trippel
Brewer: Harpoon Brewery
Source: Bottle
Rating: ** (6.9 of 10)
Comments:  Harpoon’s version of a Belgian Trappist ale is golden, a bit cloudy, and effervescent.  The aroma is clove and musty grains.  The taste is a mix of bananas, apricots, and spices.  The beer leaves not lacing and the head evaporates quickly as does the bubbles.  It’s an okay beer, but seems like it should do more to live up to its Trappist heritage.