Podcasts of the Week Ending December 19


Ben Franklin’s World :: The World of the Wampanoag

A two-party history of the indigenous people of Eastern Massachusetts who encountered the Puritan settlers of Plymouth in 1620.

Planet Money :: We Buy a Lot of Christmas Trees

A behind-the-scenes look into how the Christmas tree market works.

Planet Money :: The Case Against Facebook

A suit filed by the federal government and 46 state attorney generals against Facebook is stirring up the long-dormant history of anti-trust action in the United States.

Radiolab :: The Ashes on the Lawn

The purposes of protest and why they can’t be modulated to avoid offending people as seen through the story of the ACT UP protests to support relief from the AIDS crisis.

Smithsonian Sidedoor :: Edison’s Demon Dolls

Talking dolls are creepy and have been so since they were first invented in the 1890s by Thomas Edison himself.

Snap Judgment :: The Crossroad

A true story of a good Samaritan in the time of COVID 19.

RUNNING TALLY OF PODCAST OF THE WEEK APPEARANCES

Podcasts of the Week Ending August 25th


BackStory :: In the Shadow of the Mushroom Cloud

Stories of the United States and nuclear weapons, including the hotel with the secret bunker for Congress, nuclear bomb testing and the birth of the Las Vegas tourist industry, and women in the Manhattan Project.

To The Best of Our Knowledge :: Being Sincere in the Cynical World

Different stories of maintaining sincerity among the world’s cynicism.

HUB History :: Amelia  Earhart in Boston

Before Amelia Earhart become a famed, groundbreaking aviator, she was a social worker in a Boston settlement house.

Radiolab :: Post No Evil

The evolving document that guides what is allowed and what is forbidden on Facebook.

Start Making Sense :: Democrats: Centrism is Not the Answer!

Elmo’s Song


I got tagged for a meme on Facebook and as my preference I’d rather post it here where I can find it again in a few months.  I think I’ve done this one before to be honest.  Most of the responses are nonsensical, but hey, there are some good songs here.

These are the “rules”:

1. Put your iTunes, Windows Media Player, etc. on shuffle.

2. For each question, press the next button to get your answer.

3. YOU MUST WRITE THAT SONG NAME DOWN NO MATTER HOW SILLY IT SOUNDS.

4. Tag n friends, where n is a non-negative integer

5. Everyone tagged has to do the same thing.

6. Have Fun!

IF SOMEONE SAYS ‘ARE YOU OKAY’ YOU SAY? “Signed, Sealed, Delivered I’m Yours” – Stevie Wonder

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOURSELF? “Come Back Baby” – Aretha Franklin

WHAT DO YOU LIKE IN A GIRL/GUY?  “Woman Be My Country” – Johnny Clegg and Savuka

HOW DO YOU FEEL? “Sail Away Lady” – Uncle Bunt Stephens

WHAT IS YOUR LIFE’S PURPOSE? “End of the Night” – The Doors

WHAT’S YOUR MOTTO? “Kansas City” – Wilbert Harrison

WHAT DO YOUR PARENTS THINK OF YOU? “Coda” – David Goodrich

WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT VERY OFTEN? “Salvation”- The Paperboys

WHAT DO YOU THINK OF YOUR BEST FRIEND? “If I Needed Someone” – The Beatles

WHAT IS YOUR LIFE STORY? “Wasted Word” – Kris Delmhorst

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO BE WHEN YOU GROW UP? “Maybe Sparrow”  – Neko Case

WHAT DO YOU THINK WHEN YOU SEE THE PERSON YOU LIKE? “The Train Song” – Music Together

WHAT IS YOUR PASSION IN LIFE?  “Ed Ladki Ko Dekha [1942- A Love Story]” –   Kumar Sanu

WHAT IS YOUR BIGGEST FEAR? “Infinity Guitars” – Sleigh Bells

WHAT DO YOU WANT RIGHT NOW? “Cruel Sea” -Maybe Baby

WHAT DOES YOUR LOVE THINK ABOUT YOU? “We Are The One” – The Avengers

WHAT WILL YOU TITLE THIS NOTE AS? “Elmo’s Song” – Sesame Street

Meme: 15 Albums


Tagged for another music related-meme on Facebook by a different friend.

The rules: Don’t take too long to think about it. Fifteen albums you’ve heard that will always stick with you. List the first fifteen you can recall in no more than fifteen minutes.

Should be easy, no?  I promise not to look at my list of 100 favorite albums list first.

  1. This Are Two Tone – Various
  2. The Ultimate Otis Redding
  3. Folk Song and Minstelry – Various
  4. Belafonte at Carnegie Hall
  5. May I Sing With Me – Yo La Tengo
  6. The Beatles (White Album)
  7. Cruel, Crazy Beautiful World – Johnny Clegg & Savuka
  8. Ágætis Byrjun – Sigur Rós
  9. Lincoln – They Might Be Giants
  10. Free to Be You & Me – Marlo Thomas & Friends
  11. Intersections – Maus
  12. Tanglewood Tree – Dave Carter and Tracey Grammer
  13. Channel 1 – Various
  14. Doolittle – The Pixies
  15. Rum, Sodomy & The Lash – The Pogues

There’s a little method to my madness.  In addition to a few of my all-time favorites that I keep coming back to I picked out some albums I remember introducing me to a new band, new sound, or new genre and thus changing my musical tastes.  At any rate I did this in much less than fifteen minutes so I’m sure it’s not representative.

Related Posts:

Meme: If your life was a movie…


A friend of mine tagged me for this meme on Facebook but I thought it would be more fun to make a blog post out of it.  I don’t what it really “says” about me but some of the answers are funny and at the very least you get to see a slice of my music collection.  Feel free to do it yourself and share your results if you like but I don’t do the tagging thing.

IF YOUR LIFE WAS A MOVIE, WHAT WOULD THE SOUNDTRACK BE?

RULES:

1: Open your library (iTunes, Winamp, Media Player, iPod, etc)

2. Put it on shuffle

3. Press play

4. For every question, type the song that’s playing

5. When you go to a new question, press the next button

6. Don’t lie and try to pretend your cool…

7.Then tag 16 friends including the one that tagged you

Opening Credits:

Strangers When We Met by the Smithereens

Waking Up:

Spectacle by Voyager

First Day at School:

Lord of Glory by The St. Louis Jesuits

Falling in Love:

Time is Tight by Booker T. & The MG’s

Fight Song:

Treat Her Right by Roy Head  (that’s right,  I’m a lover not a fighter!)

Breaking Up:

Very Fine Funeral by Eddie From Ohio (a bit extreme, yes)

Prom:

Wurz + Blosse by the Wighnomy Brothers (apparently our prom was on Ibiza)

Life’s OK:

Will You Be Lovin’ Another Man by the The Vinal Avenue String Band

Mental Breakdown:

Born to Lose by the Ray Charles (this one really hits the mark)

Driving:

So Far Around the Bend by The National

Flashback:

Ana Ng by They Might Be Giants

Getting Back Together:

Buffalo Soldier by Bob Marley

Wedding:

Black Satin by the Raveonettes

Birth of Child:

After the Tornado by Jim’s Big Ego

Final Battle:

Beat on the Brat by The Ramones (apparently I do fight, with a baseball bat)

Death Scene:

Darlin’ One by The Replacements

Funeral Song:

My Iron Lung by Radiohead

End Credits:

Girl They Won’t Believe It by Joss Stone

Related posts:

del.icio.us, Library Thing, and Twitter updates


Here’s how I’m using my social networking tools these days.

del.icio.us

When I first registered for del.icio.us I imported all the bookmarks from my browser and then didn’t use it for a year.  I didn’t really need all those bookmarks so I cleaned things up by deleting them all.  I also cleaned up and consolidated misspelled tags.  I went back to all the links I’ve posted over the past 6 months and added the name of the source (newspaper, website or blog name) as a tag in hopes I can look back and see which sources I can recommend as reliable, or at least interesting. I may go back and retroactively add in all the articles from the many link-of-the-day posts in this blog.

Library Thing

In the process of entering (almost) every book I’ve ever read. I don’t actually own many books but I’ve kept lists of what I read for the past 18 years.  I also hope to use it to rank my favorite books of all time.  I may also try cataloging my son’s collection of children’s books just for kicks.

Twitter

Some strangers asked to follow me right off the bat, so I followed them back  which was fun for a day or so.  Then I was overwhelmed by the minutiae of their daily lives.  I’m eagerly seeking to use this as a professional development tool by following librarians who tweet about ideas and activities in their jobs and libraries. So from now on I plan only to follow librarians as well as non-librarian folks I already know.

I’m also using Facebook to play lots of games of Scrabulous, WordTwist, and Scramble which I guess proves that Facebook is a valuable social networking tool for wasting time with your friends.

I’m a Twit


So, I finally gave in and registered for Twitter even though I really do not understand the practical purpose of the tool. I mean I understand what it’s for – telling people what you’re up to at every minute of the day – I just don’t know what it does for a shy guy like me and especially what it does professionally. Yet, I read library blog after library blog hailing Twitter as a great social networking tool. So I caved and decided to give it a try. Don’t want to be classified as a troglodyte who’s afraid of change after all.

Long-time readers will recall that I went through the same process with Facebook last year. Even though I found some things that Facebook is good for (Susan compares it to collecting one’s friends like Hummels), and find it fun to play games with my friends, professionally I’ve done zilch. Seemingly the moment I was convinced to sign up with Facebook was when Facebook-backlash began. Now people frustrated with Facebook offer plaudits for Twitter instead. So maybe I can be ahead of the curve, or at least on the curve this time. So far I’ve found that Twitter is a good forum for writing Haiku and publishing Overheard-type comments. If you want to follow me you can find me at http://twitter.com/Othemts.

Here’s a typical article Why Twitter Matters from iLibrarian.

Library Links of the Day for 22 January 2008


What Facebook is Good For


Prompted by invites from friends and discussions of it’s usefulness in the library blogosphere I joined Facebook at the beginning of August (See previously: On Facebook Now). Due to my age, ignorance, or perhaps even my anti-social tendencies, I wasn’t sure of what exactly I use Facebook for, but I plowed ahead anyway.

Recently, Susan asked me “Have you figured out what Facebook is good for yet?” At the time I didn’t have a good answer. Visions of connecting with librarians around the world and thus using social networking to become the best librarian I can possibly be have not yet materialized. According to some Facebook is a waste of time that costs businesses millions, while others believe that Facebook may help change the world for the better. Pondering the question, I’ve come up with three things I’ve discovered that Facebook is good for.

  1. Connecting with old friends, colleagues and even a couple of strangers. I gave up on letter writing for the most part a few years ago because no one ever writes me back. Even email, which I find pretty easy, seems to be too time consuming for others. So it’s nice to have a place to check in with my buddies that I don’t see every day to just josh around and keep in touch. Otherwise I’d be stuck just seeing them at weddings and baby showers.
  2. Scrabulous. This is one of the many fun applications you can add to your Facebook profile. Most of them are fun once, but playing Scrabble with friends and strangers is addictive. On the most recent Uncontrolled Vocabulary podcast, Greg Schwartz admitted that Scrabulous is the only reason he still checks in on Facebook. That kind of makes me feel better about not networking with librarians in Peru and Botswana to save the world.
  3. Posted Items. This is my absolute favorite feature of Facebook. One of the things I like best about blogging is being able to refer back to interesting articles and blog posts I read, but not every interesting article is worth blogging about so I ended up with a surplus of draft posts in WordPress. I also would save articles from my feeds in Bloglines but that would get too cluttered. With Posted Items I can save articles, blog posts, web pages, photo albums, whatever and share them (albeit with the limited audience of my friends) automatically. There’s even a button you can add to the browser.

Here’s a selection of my favorite Posted Items on Facebook since early August:

  • August 1, 2007. New York Times. In Praise of Tap Water
    • The one thing about bottled water these days is that it is easier to come by since (clean, functional) drinking fountains seem to be less common.  Plus I’m always misplacing bottles so I have to buy bottled water and then refill it.  But honestly I’ve never bought into the bottled water being healthier concept.
  • August 2, 2007. Boston Globe. Sawed off and ugly, by Donovan Slack.
    • Seeing half a telephone pole hanging off another pole has mystified me for some time.  Now I know why.
  • August 15, 2007. WireTap Magazine. Future Civil Rights: Next Move is Ours, by Biko Baker.
    • I don’t like all of this article, but I like this: “We don’t need to believe in the leadership of one superhero; we need to believe in ourselves. No one else is going to step up and lead us but us. We are all Malcolm. We are all Martin. And until we really begin believing that, we will never be able to conquer the insurmountable odds that are up against us. I believe we can and we will. We are all makers of history; it’s time for us to start acting like it.”
  • August 30, 2007. Shaenon LiveJournal blog. The Trouble With Tribbles as Adapted by Edward Gorey.
    • Two of my favorite popular culture artifacts joined together.  And it’s hillarious.
  • September 8, 2007. Gift of Green. Top Ten Things About Massachusetts That Get a “Huh?” in Virginia.
    • This is interesting since I came to Massachusetts from Virginia albeit preceded by Connecticut.  Because of my New England childhood I’m well aware of regular coffee, radiators, the Blizzard of 78, and the adjectival use of wicked.  I never thought of raspberry lime rickeys or fluffernutters as particularly Massachusetts (the latter seems gooey and gross enough to be loved in the South).  I thought bubbler was used in the midwest and I first heard of jimmies in  Pennsylvania.  So really the three-deckers is the only thing in this list that was new to me when I came to MA.
  • September 18, 2007. Scientific American. 5 Essential Things To Do In Space, by George Musser.
    • I love space exploration.  It’s good to have a plant for its future.
  • September 18, 2007. Britannica Blog. Land, Ho! The Northwest Passage is Open For Business, by Gregory McNamee.
    • This is essentially a satirical article about global warming, but as a history major I love the concept that the Northwest Passage is now here, 400 years late.  There’s a Talk Like a Pirate Day reference as well.


On Facebook Now


I’m pretending to be a young, connected hipster by participating in Facebook. I’ve added a WordPress application in hopes of drawing more attention to Panorama of the Mountains. The application also allows me to make posts to WordPress from within Facebook for whatever reason. So I’m trying it out.

Anyhow, I still don’t really know what Facebook actually does but I find it strangely compelling and addictive.