Soccer Week


1. FC Kaiserslautern 2:0  FC Bayern Munich (27 Aug 2010) – This game was hosted by the oddly named team (is that  like First National Bank?) in the same stadium where the 2006 World Cup debacle between USA & Italy took place.  Defending German and DFB-Pokal champions and Champions League runners up took on 1. FC Kaiserlautern who were also champions.  Of the second Bundesliga.  One would think that Bayern would romp over the recently promoted 1FCK.  One would be wrong.  Bayern played reminiscent of the US MNT getting many chances but unable to finish.  Meanwhile, 1FCK scored two quick goals near the end of the the first half which was all they need.  I tend to favor underdogs, especially plucky underdogs who defeat the champions in their first Bundesliga game in four years, so I think I’m adopting 1FCK as my new German team to follow.  Match report.

New England Revolution 1:2 Philadelphia Union (28 Aug 2010)

I was only able to watch the second half of this game so I had the misfortune of seeing the Revolution playing a man down attempting to defend a 1:0 lead.  They did well for a while but ultimately ran out of steam and lost the win in the 82nd minute and the tie in stoppage time.  For the second time in a row I’ve watched the Revolution throw away a winnable game in what is increasingly becoming a lost season (in between this game and the previous one I watched, the Revolution also lost 4-1 to Kansas City).  At least the Revolution can still win the Superliga cup on Wednesday.  Match report.

By the way, I’ve discovered The Midnight Ride, a fan-produced podcast with good coverage of the Revolution.

Boston Breakers 2:1 Philadelphia Independence (29 Aug 2010)

The Revolution’s female counterparts are faring much better in the WPS.  I only caught the last 20 minutes of the Breakers’ win which brought them closer to second place and shored up an almost certain spot in the postseason.  Watching the game I was a bit depressed to see the Independence playing in a small American football stadium with few fans, something of culture shock after watching so many European games.  At least I’ve learned that the Independence and Union will be moving into a soccer-specific stadium soon, although it is not in Philadelphia proper.  Actually, I figured out that the Boston Breakers are the only team in the WPS that actually play within the city limits of the city they’re named for.  Way to represent Breakers!  Match report.

Internazionale 0:0 Bologna (30 Aug 2010)

I’ve shied away from Serie A because of a perhaps unfair bias that Italian soccer is where all the stereotypes of soccer come to life:  defensive play, diving, not to mention match-fixing.  This match up of the 5-in-a-row defending champions Inter versus the cellar dweller Bologna should’ve been Chelsea-Wigan style smackdown.  It was not.  There was a lot of defense, diving, and who knows maybe even match-fixing.  Dull, dull, dull.  Match report.

New England Revolution 1:2 Monarcas Morelia (1 Sep 2010)

The Revs last chance for hardware in 2010 ended disappointingly in this hotly contested Superliga final.   Morelia pretty much dominated play although Revolution errors contributed to the loss, particularly the first goal which came on a penalty kick after a dumb foul.  Miguel Sabah won the game for Morelia with a gorgeous volley in the 75th minute.  The Revs showed some life with a nice goal of their own by Kevin Allston (his first with the Revs) in the 79th minute.  The Revs had some chances right up to the last second, but alas they will only be Superliga runners-up.  Still this was a fun, fast-paced game.  I enjoyed the passion that was evident on the field and in the stands even if I didn’t like the poor sportsmanship (such as Morelia’s time wasters or Revolution fans throwing things on the field).  Match report.

Armenia 0:1 Ireland (3 Sep 2010)

The Euro 2012 qualifying campaign kicks of this weekend and I’ve adopted my ancestral home squad of Ireland to follow.  At least until they are eliminated.   The opening match in Yerevan, Armenia was not exceptionally well-played but both sides had some action in front of the nets.  Armenia had one particularly breathtaking spell with several opportunities in a row before the Irish defense cleared the ball and Ireland’s skipper Robbie Keane so a can’t-miss-opportunity deflected by the post.  Finally, Ireland broke-through with a 76th minute goal by Keith Fahey, his first for the national team.  A good start to what I hope will be a strong Euro campaign by Ireland.

Other notes:

  • Following my train of thought regarding WPS teams named after cities I looked to see if there were any teams in London that have London in their name.  There are thirteen clubs in the Premier League and Football Leagues and many more in the lower divisions based in London and none of them have London in their name.  I suppose that the club would have to be based in the City of London to earn that name but I doubt there’s room for a stadium there.
  • This week the world of football lost a living link to the first World Cup when Franciso Varallo died.  Varallo played for Argentina the team that were runners up in the 1930 World Cup

Related Posts:

This Week in Soccer


Here’s the report on my first week as a novice soccer fan.  See my previous post Forming an Association with Football for more details.

USA v. Brazil (10 Aug 2010) – A friendly match in the New Meadowlands stadium in New Jersey to thank the US fans for their World Cup support.  Supposedly the experienced US side fresh from the World Cup would have something to show to a young Brazilian team featuring many players appearing in their first international match.  Instead, it turned into an embarrassing rout with stylish Brazilian play exposing the weakness of the USA’s back line with attack after attack after attack.  Only great goalkeeping by Tim Howard and Brad Guzan prevented Brazil from running up the score.  More on this debacle from the Boston Globe.

At the very least seeing Brazilian players in the Meadowlands reminded me of the glory days of Pele and the New York Cosmos.

Mexico vs. Spain (11 Aug 2010) – I stopped in a pub in Boston for supper on Wednesday night and they had Spain’s first World Cup championship friendly at Mexico on the TV.  This game was Spain’s first defense of a lesser-known title, the Unofficial Football World Championship.  Basically the UFWC folks have created a basic title system akin to boxing championships tracing back to the earliest international football match in 1872.  When Spain defeated the Netherlands in the World Cup championship they ended the Dutch run of 21 title defenses and unified the UFWC with the official world championship.  Mexico had a good chance of snatching the title away from Spain with an early first half goal but David Silva of Spain equalized in stoppage time just before the end of the game (the UFWC champion retains the title in a tie).  The drama of the moment was lost on me because the Univision broadcast for some reason reset the clock at zero at the start of the second half so I had thought I was watching the first half until the players started shaking hands.

Bayern Munich vs. Real Madrid (13 Aug 2010) –  Yet another friendly, this team matched two European club powers to contest the Beckenbauer Cup in tribute to the Bayern great Franz Beckenbauer.  It was fun to watch some of the best players in the world duke it out but the game ended as 0-0 tie with Real Madrid winning the cup in a penalty shootout.  Real Madrid’s goalkeeper Iker Casillas proved to be the hero of the match with several dramatic saves.

This leads me to a question which will probably betray my ignorance and American heritage:  How is it that with the goals in soccer being so enormous that there are so many scoreless games?  I mean if you ever stand by one of those nets it would seem impossible for a ball not to get in there no matter how good the keeper and the defense.


This weekend was too busy to watch soccer so I didn’t see any games of the teams I purportedly am following.  I did learn that as a supporter of Everton and the US national team I can be double embarrassed by Tim Howard’s fumble in the penalty area which allowed Blackburn to score the only goal of the game:

I’ve also I discovered a German team with the best name ever:  Wormatia Worms. Granted it’s funnier in English if you imagine annelids playing soccer, and ignore that Worms is the name of city in Germany.  Still, if the Wormatia Worms played higher than the fourth division in Germany I’d definitely start watching their games.

Forming an Association with Football (aka Soccer)


For many, many years I’ve been meaning to pay more attention to soccer.  It’s a sport I enjoy both on the field as well as it’s history and folklore. Soccer has been part of my life since I was a child and played in the Stamford Youth Soccer League and watched New York Cosmos games. Yet I find many obstructions to following the game today outside of the quadrennial FIFA World Cup.  These include:

  1. I live in the United States where soccer coverage is hard to come by, even for our local professional teams.  I seem to be able to take in news of American Football (which I dislike) by osmosis, but have to dig deep to fin anything about soccer.
  2. I don’t own a television.  Even if I did, I probably couldn’t afford the cable packages that include coverage of European football.  Local saloons generally don’t show soccer games either, especially if there’s a Red Sox game on.
  3. I have a family, and a job, and lots of preoccupations that suck up my time.

Nevertheless, with the seasons beginning in the European leagues, I’m committing myself to trying to follow some teams in addition to my local Boston teams:

The choice of teams is somewhat arbitrary although with exception of Barcelona, all of these teams are from cities I’ve visited and enjoyed.

I started today by watching Ajax’s opening match at FC Groningen online. After a quiet first half, things were looking good for my new favorite Dutch side.  Ajax’s new Moroccan forward Mounir El Hamdaoui scored two goals to put the team comfortably ahead.  But as the minutes ticked away in the second half, Ajax gave those two goals back and had to settle for a tie.  According to a tweet I read this is “the first time they give away 2 goal-lead since losing 4-2 at Vitesse on 24 December 2006.”   More on the game from the Ajax website.  I actually missed bot of El Hamdaoui’s goals as I was distracted by my son, but that’s okay, that’s what replays are for.

So as the season continues I’ll try to update on my spectator experiences.  If anyone has any tips or resources for the novice fan, please put them in the comments.  And yes, I do plan to continue to use the word soccer.  I like it’s distinctive and unambiguous sound compared to the more pedestrian football.