Lucky 13


Today my lovely bride Susan and I celebrate 13 years of wedded bliss. It’s good to remember that day in 2005 when we had over 100 of our friends and family present, sailed on a boat, played kickball, danced, and ate yummy cake.  It was a beautiful day.  The 4748 days in-between have been pretty good too!

Happy Anniversary, Susan!

Support Sharon and Team McGraw


I have an awesome friend name Sharon.  Today is her birthday but that’s not what this post is about.  I’m writing because in exactly one month Sharon will be running in the New York City Marathon.  Sharon’s story is inspiring in that just the past two years she’s lost a lot of weight, got in shape, and built up her strength and ability to run many, many miles.

But it gets better than that.  Sharon is running as a member of Team McGraw to support the Tug McGraw Foundation.  If you’re not aware, Tug McGraw is a major league baseball relief pitcher who helped the New York Mets win their first World Series in 1969.  When the Mets were contending for the pennant again in 1973, Tug coined the team’s famous rallying cry “Ya Gotta Believe!”  Later in his career, McGraw pitched for the Philadelphia Phillies and was on the mound when that team won its first World Series in 1980.  As a result, Tug is a rare player who is beloved in both New York and Philadelphia.

Tug McGraw died in 2004 as a result of a brain tumor.  Which brings us back to Sharon who is running to support the Tug McGraw Foundation and enhance the quality of life of people living with brain tumors, post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injuries.  Sharon has been working hard to raise a lot of money, so if you read this, please consider taking a moment to donate to Sharon’s fundraising efforts and wish her well in the New York City Marathon.

Where the Monkey Craps in the Buckwheat (concert review)


Last night I was fortunate to see folk singer/songwriter Peter Mulvey play a set at the Passim Folk Music and Cultural Center. Apparently, the last time I went to a concert it was also Peter Mulvey as reviewed on this blog a year ago (before the baby was born, but not before I was married). I sat with my friend Craig as well as his friend Sheila who I met for the first time. Sadly, Susan was not able to attend because our baby Peter had a fever.   One day we’ll take Peter to see Peter.

Beyond brilliant guitar playing and lyrics, it’s a joy to see Peter Mulvey because he tells great stories between songs.  Some of the best are about his father Frank, who apparently used the phrase “I told him I know where the monkey craps in the buckwheat.”  Frank Mulvey tried to defend this as a commonly-used phrase, which it isn’t, but it should be and I’m going to work it into my everyday conversation.  Peter Mulvey also told tales about his second No Gasoline Tour, where he traveled between shows in Wisconsin on bicycle.  Next year he promises to ride to Boston.

Mulvey played a great set with many unfamiliar songs – some new songs of his own and a lot of great covers.  The complete set list is below.  The titles of songs #3, #4, & #14 are my best guesses.

Openers: Ryan Fitzsimmons (guitar) with Ian Goldstein (mandolin)

  1. Stranded in a Limousine (Paul Simon)
  2. If Love is Not Enough
  3. I Go Mmm-Mmm-Mmm
  4. Raven on the Roof
  5. The Kids in the Square
  6. Old Fashioned Hat (Anais Mitchell)
  7. Health Food Girl
  8. Welcome Back (John Sebastian) – with Ian Goldstein
  9. Easiest Thing to Do – with Ian Goldstein
  10. Hang Down Your Head (Tom Waits) – with Ian Goldstein
  11. The Knuckleball Suite – with Ian Goldstein
  12. Dynamite Bill
  13. Shirt
  14. Black Rabbit (instrumental)
  15. Mailman
  16. Sad, Sad, Sad, Sad, and Far Away From Home

Encore: All You Need is Love (Lennon/McCartney)

Two years


On this day in 2005, Susan and I celebrated our nuptials at the Paulist Center in Boston and followed up with a reception on Thomson Island in Boston Harbor. It was a beautiful, wonderful, joyful day (and the ensuing 729 days of marriage have been pretty good too)! Even Hurricane Ophelia couldn’t mar the day, which was gray, but it never actually rained.

We Laughed…

We Cried (well, I cried at least)…

We Played Kickball!

Relive all the memories of our wedding day online!

Happy anniversary Suze, I hope we have many, many more.

Saturday at the ALA Annual Conference


When I was a teenager I wanted to grow up to be Ken Burns, or at least a whole lot like him.  Of course I never became a filmmaker nor a professional historian, I became a librarian.  But Ken Burns is down with librarians and addressed us early on Saturday morning.  He spoke of how after The Civil War he didn’t want to make another movie about war because he didn’t want to be typecast nor be mistaken for glorfying war.  Two things changed his mind: 1) that 1000 WWII veterans die each day & 2) that a large (but unnamed) percentage of graduating high school seniors believe that the US fought WWII allied with Germany against Russia.  So he and Florentine Films made The War, a 14-hour film about the experience of ordinary soldiers and ordinary people on the homefront during the Second World War.  He showed us a half-hour preview of the film which focuses on four towns in the United States and how people in those towns were affected by the war.  The film was very powerful and contained the most graphic archival footage of the war I’ve ever seen.  If the 30 minute sample is any indication, this may be Ken Burns’ best documentary yet.  Burns closed with a quote from Abraham Lincoln which he described as the best sentence ever written: “The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely the will be, by the better angels of our nature.”

From one childhood hero to another.  In the exhibition center Arthur Frommer and his daughter Pauline signed replica copies of the 1957 edition of Europe on $5 a Day.  I’ve been addicted to reading guidebooks and travel literature since I was a kid, and Frommer was one of my early favorites.  Back upstairs I attended the ACRL 101 session which wasn’t too different from the NMRT Conference 101 session but I got a few useful tips and handouts.

I rode the shuttle bus over to the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill, at lunch and attended two sessions of RUSA STARS on resource sharing.  The first was a committee meeting on reavaluating resource sharing policies which I simply observed.  It was drowned out by the exburant speechifying and applause of another session in the next room.  More interesting was the Hot Topics in Resource Sharing session where my newly aqcuainted colleagues and I talked about customer services issues, copyright problems, and Ariel v. Odyssey.

Back at the convention center I went to the convention center to write an email to my friend Sharon who I didn’t see at the Ken Burns session in the morning.  Moments after I sent the email, I heard a voice call my name.  It was Sharon who was also in the Internet Cafe.  We went to the Capitol City Brewing Co. for dinner and talked about libraries and babies.

And that was that professionally for Saturday.  I had plans to go out Saturday night but didn’t do much as I wasn’t much in the mood, but I did go for a long walk around Washington’s 14th Street and U Street neighborhoods.

I’ll write about Sunday tonight or tomorrow.  The Book Cart Drill Team is coming up next!

Another Weekend in New York


For Christmas, my mother generously gave Susan and I tickets to see Madama Butterfly performed by the New York City Opera at the New York State Theater in Lincoln Center. My friend Mike M., an Atlanta Braves fan, and I have a tradition of catching a Mets-Braves game at Shea Stadium each spring. Fortuitously, the Mets-Braves series and the opera fell on the same weekend and a plan was hatched!

My photos from the weekend.

We drove down early Saturday morning in Mike’s Truckasaurus. From past experience and the many warning of Mets announcers about the lack of parking at Shea, I was worried we’d be stuck in traffic and have to park in a remote region of Long Island. Despite many bathroom breaks for Mike, we arrived about an hour before game time and got parking close to the stadium, so all that worry was for naught.

We sat in the Upper Deck boxes behind home plate. There was a great family of season ticket holders in front of us. Both the man and woman kept score and compared notes during the game. They were die-hard scorekeepers as the man kept a baseball-shaped pencil sharper on hand for mid-game sharpening. The man didn’t like the Wave at all and I have to agree with him. Twenty years ago fans at Shea did the Wave during a Met rally as a coordinated effort to cheer on the action on the field. Nowadays, the Wave seems to happen when the fans are bored, and it’s a pretty tired activity at that.

It was a big day at Shea. First it was Luggage Tag Day (almost as exciting as Mets Ice Cube Tray Day) as all fans received a classy leather tag upon entering. Next it was Earth Day and volunteers from the EPA made a token appearance to collect recyclable cans and bottles (they didn’t stick around too long after the game though). The best part is that it was Dog Day in the Park and Mets fans walked their pooches around the warning track prior to the game. A lot of cute dogs in Mets bandanas out there. This brought much delight to Susan.

The highlight of the day was the on field action between the Mets and Braves. Young Ollie Perez pitched beautifully, including 20 straight strikes at one point. I got to rib Mike a lot about all the 0-2 counts on the Braves batters. I also got to see the most exciting player in baseball, Jose Reyes, doing what he does best: getting on base and then stealing bases.

The Mets broke the game open with a series of home runs over the 5th & 6th innings. I didn’t see any of these because I was attempting to get money by waiting in line at the slowest ATM in the world, and then waiting again to buy ice cream. I didn’t mind too much because I think I was getting too much sun on a warm April day. Spending so much time packed like a sardine within Shea’s interior makes me appreciate the need for constructing a new stadium with extra wide concourses.

For more on the Mets v. Braves, see my latest baseball post Meet the Mets.

After the game, we spent some time under the elevated tracks with a drink and a snack. I was impressed with how quickly and efficiently most of the other fans were moved away from the park. By the time we were ready to go there was no wait for Mike to drive out of the parking lot nor for us to board the 7 train. We zipped downtown to Times Square and then transfered uptown to our hotel in the Upper West Side. The Hotel Riverside Studios promotes their plaid bedspreads and matching drapes, but something about the corridor makes it look like the kind of place where artists go to shoot heroin. We came up with a slogan for the hotel “You’ll come for our plaid bedspreads, you’ll stay for our shady corridors!” The neighborhood was lovely with lots of colorful, stone-front row houses.

After a nap which I couldn’t shake off right away, we headed out for dinner. An excellent soul band played on the crowded platform at 72 St. Station. The lead vocalist had one of those powerful, throat-shredding voices and the guitarist and drummer offered lovely harmonies. They made the rather crumby Commodores’ song “Easy” sound really, really good. I was a bit thrown by the subway not making local stops, grumpified more as I groggily made along the packed sidewalks near Times Square, and positively mortified when I knocked over a candle and broke a glass as we were seated at the restaurant. I was soothed by the delicious Indian food and the friendly staff at the former Nirvana 54.

We strolled down 5th Avenue to the Empire State Building which Susan wanted to visit on recommendation from our nephew Cassidy. The wait was long though, so we took a pass. It was a nice walk and maybe we’ll return and go up when Cassidy is with us. Back at the hotel Susan searched unsuccessfully for a Tom Hanks movie, her New York tradition. Then we went to sleep.

On Sunday we ate breakfast at a cafe on the corner of 71 St. and Broadway. We strolled down to Lincoln Center, but it was far too early, so we made our way over Central Park to get out of the sun. New Yorkers celebrated the warm weather by taking all their cute babies and dogs to the park. We watched for a long time as a young lad played baseball with his dad, always running the wrong way when he hit the ball. Topping off our park experience, we ate Ferrara’s pastries by the USS Maine monument.

We walked around the Lincoln Center complex which really is an amazing complex. This is what Modernism looks like at it’s very best. I especially like the railings in the New York State Theater which look like Jackson Pollock paintings formed into class. Upon entering the Fourth Ring to find our seats, Susan said “Wow!” which I think sums it up. The couple sitting in front of us seemed more inured to the opera house experience. During intermissions he read a book and she did the Times crossword.

For more on the performance read my post Opera Review: Madama Butterfly.

After the opera we strolled up Amsterdam Avenue to Fred’s Restaurant. This place is pretty much a dog-themed bar based on the story of a female lab named Fred who wasn’t able to work as a guide dog for the blind, but was lovingly adopted by the restaurant owners. The walls are lined with autographed photos of dogs from around the world. Susan loved it. Fred’s appears to be a good place to take your children as the other tables were teaming with adorable young’uns. Come to think of it, I think our entire weekend was dominated by dogs and children. Anyhow, the food and staff at Fred’s are great too.

After that we took a long, hot bus ride home and arrived groggy and grumpy. And that was our weekend.


Speaking of New York City, this online gallery of photos of New York from 1964-1969 contains many great images of the city and its inhabitants by Irwin Klein. While this is a little bit before my time, it’s still nostalgic as the city and the people in the photos remind of New York when I was a child.

Christmas in North Carolina, New Year in Virginia


Susan and I took our annual swing south to visit our families in North Carolina and Virginia for the holidays. For Christmas I got a new toy from my favorite parents-in-law, a Canon PowerShot A630 digital camera. Now I don’t have to wait for my prints to come back and order CD-ROM’s to have digital photos. Better yet I can post photo albums on my web page in a timely manner so you can enjoy the Holidays 2006 photo album . I’ll still find use for my old Yashica T4 point & shoot though, it takes too good a photo just disregard it.

Here are a couple of my favorite photos:

We met Krista & Scott’s son Sam for the first time and saw that he enjoyed chewing on the tail of his plush rat Bu (short for Bubonic).

My sister Barbara and nephew Cassidy. My relatives are just so photogenic. Cassidy now has a blog of his own called Project 365 which will feature a photo a day for the entire year of 2007.

Happy New Year to all!