Photopost: Up on the Roof


On Independence Day we went to the members’ party on the roof of the Museum of Science parking garage to watch the Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular. The fireworks were actually a bit obstructed (damn you Royal Sonesta hotel!) but there were beautiful views of the surrounding cityscape as the sun set on the 4th of July.

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Resistance Mixtape – Independence Day


Over the past few months I’ve been collecting songs for what I call the Resistance Mixtape.

Music can soothe and inspire.  Songs can tell stories and instruct. And most importantly music brings people together.

Here are some songs for the Resistance Mixtape for Independence Day.

Let’s begin with Paul Robeson, singing about “The House I Live In.”

Woody Guthrie’s famous response to “God Bless America” noted that even in a land where people wait in line at the relief office and signs say “No Trespassing” that the reality is that “This Land is Your Land.”

Prince & the Revolution similarly question the premise of “America the Beautiful” and whether or not the grace of God trickles down to our children.

Kim Weston sings a stirring version of the song known as “The Black National Anthem.”

Finally, the love we have for our own nation need does not mean we hate or demean other nations as we learn in the hymn “This is My Song” written by Lloyd Stone.

What other songs would you add to the mixtape?

Boston Harborfest / Independence Day Weekend Walking Tours


What better way to celebrate our nation’s birthday in Boston than by attending Harborfest, watching the Fourth of July Pops concert and fireworks, taking Boston By Foot Walking tours!

I’ll be leading three Boston By Foot walking tours this weekend, and there are many more tours on the calendar.

Saturday, July 2nd, 2:00-3:30 pm – Come to where land meets water in Boston on the Historic Waterfront Tour.  Meets at 290 Congress Street by Fort Point Channel:

Boston has a great seafaring heritage. Ocean trade and its related industries had a major impact on the growth of Boston and the shape and character of its waterfront.

This tour includes the beginnings of Long Wharf as the grand entry into Boston, and the genesis of its Financial District, the lore of clipper ships and the China Trade, and classic 19th century Boston granite wharf buildings such as Commercial Wharf, Lewis Wharf, and Union Wharf.

Today’s waterfront is a vibrant mix of hotels, restaurants, residences, and recreational spaces, from Atlantic Wharf on the Fort Point Channel to Battery Wharf in the North End.

Take in the spectacular views of Boston Harbor as we wind our way among the wharves old and new.

Sunday, July 3, 3:00-4:30 pm – Learn about the life of the Boston-born printer, scientist, politician, and founder on the Benjamin Franklin: Son of Boston Tour.  Meets at the corner of Washington and School Streets near the Irish Famine Memorial:

Celebrate and learn about the life of Benjamin Franklin by walking among the sites of his homes and haunts in Colonial Boston.

In his day, Benjamin Franklin was America’s greatest scientist, inventor, diplomat, humorist, statesman, and entrepreneur. Ben was born in Boston, came of age in Philadelphia, and was the darling of Paris. From his many inventions, creations of civic, philanthropic, and educational institutions, to his roles in the founding of America, his legacy is immeasurable.

Monday, July 4, 11:00 am – 12:30 pm – Celebrate Independence Day on Boston By Foot’s flagship tour of the city’s historic core, Heart of the Freedom Trail.  Meets by the Samuel Adams statue in front of Faneuil Hall.  Note: Get downtown early before the tour and see a parade from City Hall Plaza to the Old State House stepping off at 9:00 am, followed by the reading of the Declaration of Independence at the Old State House at 10:00 am!

The perfect introduction to the history of Boston!

This walking tour of the Freedom Trail in downtown Boston begins with the city’s establishment in 1630. The story of Boston unfolds through an exploration of the city’s architecture spanning more than three centuries. Beginning with the Puritan settlement, the tour continues through the American Revolution and the growth of commercial Boston and concludes with a discussion of modern development.

This historic walk features many of the downtown Freedom Trail sites, including the Old State House, Faneuil Hall, King’s Chapel, the Old South Meeting House and the site of the first public school in America.

From the protests of Samuel Adams and James Otis to the Boston Massacre and the Boston Tea Party, to the liberation of Boston in 1776 by General Washington and his army, the Heart of The Freedom Trail takes you to the sites and tells the stories that led to American independence.

Join us downtown and experience the world famous Freedom Trail with Boston By Foot!

My future walking tour schedule:

July 7: The Dark Side of Boston – 6pm

July 14: The Dark Side of Boston – 6pm

July 15:  Heart of the Freedom Trail – 11am

July 21:  Jamaica Plain – 6pm

July 28: The Dark Side of Boston – 6pm

August 4: The Dark Side of Boston  – 6pm

August 11: The Dark Side of Boston – 6pm

August 18: The Dark Side of Boston – 6pm

August 25: The Dark Side of Boston – 6pm

August 26:  Heart of the Freedom Trail – 11am

August 26:  Road to Revolution – 1pm

Happy Independence Day


On July 2, 1776 the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia voted for independence thus birthing a new nation, the United States of America.  As John Adams wrote,

“The Second Day of July 1776, will be the most memorable Epocha, in the History of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival. It ought to be commemorated, as the Day of Deliverance by solemn Acts of Devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more.”

So how are you celebrating Independence Day today?

Wait? You’re not celebrating until July 4th, a date on which nothing of great significance.   Sure, the document known as the Declaration of Independence was approved on that day, but the momentous event of actually declaring independence already happened on July 2nd.  The idea of the Declaration being written, presented to Congress, and signed on July 4th as depicted in art never happened that way.  The Declaration was written over the course of June, presented on June 28th,  and signed on August 2nd (with other delegates adding names through the autumn).

So we celebrate our nation’s independence on the wrong day.  Still we can make it work.  We love our country and we love to celebrate, so why not have two days?  We can celebrate the real Independence Day or Adams’ Independence Day on July 2nd and the conventional wisdom Independence Day or Declaration of Independence Day on July 4th.

Having two Independence Days solves the “July 4th falls on a Wednesday problem.” When July 4 falls on Monday or Friday we celebrate on July 4th. When July 2nd falls on a Monday or Friday we celebrate on July 2nd. When July 2nd is Sunday and July 4th is Tuesday we split the difference and observe Independence Day on July 3rd. Same thing when July 2nd is on Thursday and July 4th on Saturday. And when July 2nd is Tuesday and July 4th is Thursday it’s a Jubilee Year and we all take the entire week off!

EDIT ON JULY 3:  I didn’t see it until today but Mallard Fillmore’s Birthday wrote a much better July 2nd Independence Day blog post than mine.  Read it now!

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Concert Review: The Greater New Bedford Summerfest


July 3, 2010
The Greater New Bedford Summerfest at New Bedford Whaling National Park in New Bedford, MA

Peter Mulvey displaying some guitar mastery on "Black Rabbit."

Summerfest is a great weekend-long event in which the historic district of this storied whaling town is turned into one big folk music and arts festival.  The breadth of folk music spans contemporary folk music and more traditional and international styles.  The festival draws some great headliners and  yet the tickets are only $15/day or $20/weekend.  Despite only my positive feelings for the festival this is only the second time I’ve attended and the last time was ten years ago.  I need to make this a more regular tradition.

I attended the festival with my mother, wife and toddler son and we all had a great time.  We attended the following three performances:

  • Peter Mulvey at the Custom House Stage – the singer/songwriter is one of our all-time favorites and his set included fine guitar work, inspired lyrics, and even impressive readings of letters he wrote for his nieces and nephews.
  • The Irish Session at the Busker Stage – a big change from the large Custom House tent, this “stage” was just a small tent set-up on a street corner for local musicians.  Peter got up to dance around a street sign and  a little girl his age joined him.  This was the highlight of the festival for me.
  • Rosin Up Your Bow: great fiddlers (Jeremy Kittel, Guy Fletcher, Doug Lamey, Jake Armerding, & Ruairidh MacMillan) at the Centre Street Stage –  This stage was set on a charming hillside and cobblestone street surrounded by historic buildings.  What a place to listen to traditional fiddle tunes and watch Peter run about.
Peter improvises to the jigs and reels of the Irish Session.

In addition to the music we enjoyed a pizza supper at Pizans New York Style Pizza and Peter climbed on whaling tools in a small park.  It’s a great event where we could all enjoy the music and feel safe with Peter running about in the streets.  As noted above I need to attend this festival again and also need to visit and explore historic New Bedford even when there’s not a festival going on.

New England maritime charm on Centre St.