Photopost: Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary


Some photos from the beautiful Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary, home to gorgeous woodlands, fields, and marshes that feel a 100-miles away from the city.

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Photopost: Wachusett Meadow


For Father’s Day this year, we once again visited one of the most beautiful places on earth, Wachusett Meadow Wildlife Sanctuary in Princeton, MA.  I guess it’s a tradition now.

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Frog on a log. Far fewer than we saw last year.
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We had no idea what these red bumps were so we showed this picture to the naturalist. He believes it’s the remains of a slime mold.
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Looking out over the Beaver Pond.
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Daisy in the meadow.
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The Meadow changes with every step as the contours shift with a new perspective.
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Purple flowers (I’m an archivist, not a botanist, all right!)
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More wildflowers.
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The stone wall, a New England tradition.
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Frog on a lily pad.

Previously: Photopost: Wachusett Meadow (2012)

Photopost: Signs of Spring


There is still snow on the ground and a chill in the wind, but it is Spring in New England all the same. On Saturday, my family and I went for a walk in the Arboretum in search of signs of Spring. We visited Drumlin Farm on Sunday where the newborn lambs were a definite sign of Spring.

Photopost: Wachusett Meadows


We celebrated Father’s Day with a hike around the beautiful Wachusett Meadow Wildlife Sanctuary in Princeton, MA.

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Photopost: Woolapalooza


My son and I attended Woolapalooza today, Drumlin Farm’s celebration of all things pertaining to sheep.  We saw one man working hard with the shears to remove the wool of many sheep quickly and skillfully.   It was surprise that there wasn’t a team of people using electric shearing tools, but he got the job done (although we did see one sheep in the meadow with a big boo-boo from the shears).  We were also impressed by the sheepdog demonstrations as a border collie expertly herded a small flock around the pasture.  This made an impression since we recently watched Babe.  The only pig at the farm was a large, pregnant sow named Hattie sleeping in the pig shed.  There were many pregnant ewes as well as new-born lambs and kids.  It was a fun day and made for some good photographs.

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Photopost: Friday Evening Hayride at Drumlin Farm


Last night we returned to Drumlin Farm for the Friday Evening Hayride.  Farmer Caroline drove the tractor out to through the fields. Along the way Drumlin Farm educator Debbie taught us that we were in fact taking a strawride and that Drumlin Farm has been under cultivation for 250 years.  Of course, around these parts I wondered “only 250 years?”

We stopped by a campfire to roast marshmallows and make s’mores.  Then we sang “She’ll Be Comin’ Round the Drumlin” for Farmer Caroline and a song about a farm called “Muscle and Arm.”  Then we heard a native American story about our special evening visitor, a screech owl!

A good time was had by all.

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Photopost: Return to Drumlin Farm


Since our first visit nearly a year ago, Drumlin Farm has become one of our family’s favorite destinations for a day out.  We’ve even become members of Mass Audubon.

Here are some photographs from our visit on Sunday.

Midnight the Pony grazes in the barn.
A contemplative cow.
Cows often look thoughtful don't they?
Sheep graze as the hayride passes by.
Peeking at the tractor and the pigs' barn.
Meeeehhh!

Audubon Nature Festival


Today we attended the 13th Annual Audubon Nature Festival at Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary in Topsfield, MA.  It was a great family event with a great number of activities for young children.  Not that my young child took much interest in a lot of the activities, but that’s okay.  Sometimes it’s just as fun to run up and down the path.

The highlight of the festival were the presentation by Eyes on Owls.  The wife-husband team of Marcia and Mark Wilson brought their menagerie of live owls for display and discussion.  It was a very interactive program and many audience members came up to practice their owl calls.

The video below shows the Wilsons at work in a program very similar to what we saw today.  My owl photos follow:

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