Photopost: A Visit to the MFA, part eight


I continued my ongoing quest to visit every gallery in the Museum of Fine Arts by visiting the Art of Asia, Oceania, and Africa wings.  It’s unfortunate that the art of the two most populous continents and some diverse island cultures are all clumped together like that, especially since the MFA boasts having a large collection of Asian arts dating back to the earliest days of the museum.  Nevertheless there was quite a delightful collection of works that had me hopping around geographically as well as through time.  One gallery deliberately mixed contemporary and classical Japanese art in a provocative way.

I also took a 3 masterpieces in 30 minutes tour and got to learn about three family portraits from three different artistic styles – Sargent’s The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit, a folk art portrait from the 1830s, and Steen’s Twelfth-Night Feast.

After these eight visits, I believe I’ve been to every permanent gallery in the museum.  Of course, art on exhibit is changing all the time, so I’ll have to go back and do it again.  Maybe next time I’ll have a theme like art with families or bridges or pets or something like that.

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Previous visits:

Blogging from A to Z Challenge: C is for “Compassion” #atozchallenge


I’m participating in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge through all of April 2017. Every day (except Sundays), I will be posting a new, original photograph (or photographs) related to the letter of the alphabet.

Today’s letter is “C” which stands for “Compassion.”

This is an image of a sculpture of Guanyin, Bodhisattva of Compassion reflected in the glass of another exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Do you like these photographs?  How do they make you feel?  Do they tell a story?  If you know a thing or two about photography, what technical suggestions would you make?  Let me know in the comments!!!

Photopost: A Visit to the MFA, part seven


Another visit to Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts. This time I focused on exploring the galleries of the Art of the Americas wing on Level G and Level 1 (I already saw the 20th century art on Level 3 on my first visit).  These galleries contain largely art of the United States from colonial times to the mid-1800s.  There is also a few good galleries of pre-Columbian art from Mesoamerica and a gallery of North American Native Peoples.  The latter gallery mixes art from centuries ago with 20th and 21st century works by Native American artists which makes for interesting comparison and contrast of art motifs over time, but I also wonder why they don’t display them in the 20th century or contemporary galleries like the European and United States works. The remainder of the galleries included a delightful mix of United States decorative arts, architecture, portraiture, landscapes, sculpture, and ship’s models arranged over time and sometimes thematically.  Then I visited the Japanese Garden outside, a beautiful and peaceful place to finish the day.

 

Previous visits:

Photopost: A Visit to the MFA, part six


I had a surprise afternoon free and so made another visit to one of my favorite places Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Having not visited in 6 months, there were a lot of new exhibitions I hadn’t seen so I focused on those:

  • Megacities Asia – 11 artists from 5 cities (Beijing, Shanghai, Delhi, Mumbai, and Seoul) create massive, provocative, and interactive works of art inspired by urban life.  The works are spread throughout the galleries of the Museum (and outside, and at Fanueil Hall Marketplace) making for interesting contrasts with other art and human experience.
  • #techstyle – fancy and whacky clothing designed with new technology expounds upon the humor and excess of the fashion world.
  • Visiting Masterpieces: Pairing Picasso – a simple gallery pairing Picasso’s works on similar subjects from different periods of his artistic style.
  • Year of the Monkey – the role of the monkey in Japanese culture explored in art from different eras.
  • Ruined: When Cities Fall – cities destroyed by war or abandonment are depicted in haunting images from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries.
  • The Idea of North: The Paintings of Lawren Harris – a collection of the Canadian modernist’s paintings of mountains, water, and glaciers in cool colors and streamlined forms.  The exhibition is curated by Steve Martin!
  • Lawren Harris: Modern Connections from the MFA Collection – adjacent to the Harris exhibit is works of art by his modernist contemporaries with similar styles including Georgia O’Keeffe and Charles Sheeler.

It was a great visit and an enjoyable experience bouncing among masterpieces and brand new creations.

Previous visits:

Photopost: A Visit to the MFA, part five


On another solo visit to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, I completed touring the Art of Europe galleries, traveling through 17th-century Dutch and Flemish, gaudy 18th-century French decorative art, 19th-century art deemed worthy by the Academy, and finally Impressionism and post-Impressionism.

Then I took the guided tour of the Art of the Americas wing, learning more about old favorites and some new surprises. I’ll probably work my way more methodically through those galleries on my next visit. Before departing I stopped in the Made in the Americas exhibition which was mostly decorative arts and textiles and seemed less interesting than similar exhibits at the Peabody Essex Museum. And I finished with the delightful Musical Instruments collection. I wish I could hear a concert on those instruments.

Previous visits:

Photopost: A Visit to the MFA, part four


To celebrate my birthday on Wednesday, I played hooky from work and paid another visit to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.  This time I was accompanied by my lovely wife Susan!

As aficionados of Dutch Golden Age art, we made our way first to the special exhibit Class Distinctions: Dutch Painting in the Age of Rembrandt and Vermeer. The name is misleading as there is only one work by Vermeer and a handful by Rembrandt.  This is not a bad thing as a number of their contemporaries painted some excellent scenes of of 17th-century Dutch life.  Jan Steen stood out as a favorite of mine.   Art was unusually popular among all income levels in the Netherlands of that era, although not usually art as fine as that on exhibit.  The exhibit is arranged to show art depicting the upper, middle, and lower classes each within their own gallery, with a fourth gallery collecting works that show the different classes interacting. Sebastian Smee has a great review of the exhibit in today’s Boston Globe that focuses on the social effect of the exhibit.

Photography was not allowed in the exhibit, so below is a list of my favorite works in the exhibit:

If you look at these paintings on your computer, make sure to zoom in on all the tiny details. The curators on the audio guide were particularly ecstatic about the brushwork.

After finishing that exhibit, Susan picked out a small but spiffy exhibit of American ceramics from the 20th century and then we wondered among the Art of the Americas gallery where we stumbled on a few surprises.

 

Previous visits:

Photopost: A Visit to the MFA, part three


I made my third visit to Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts to slowly explore the art collections, gallery by gallery, piece by piece. You can see my first and second trips on this blog.  On this visit I decided to focus on the Art of Europe galleries. I started out on level 1, which turned out not to always be European, nor even “art,” but the was fine. In fact I saw several wonderful exhibitions. The Kunstkammer Gallery honors the “cabinets of curiosity” that flourished in 17th century Europe and were the root of modern museums. The collections included hand-crafted automatons with videos that showed them working! Pastoral to Pop shows the rapid change in British prints and drawings over the course of the 20th century. And my favorite of all, Unfinished Stories is an absolutely delightful collection of found photographs grouped together by themes.  You’ll never look at your family snapshots the same way.

On the second level, I explored the Italian Renaissance art gallery and learned about Maiolica, the brightly colored Italian tin-glazed pottery.  I then joined a highlights tour of the Art of Europe which took us from a 12th-century Catalan chapel through the works of the Impressionists.  It was an informative hour.  I was able to return to the medieval and Renaissance galleries on my own for a more in-depth exploration, but then my time ran out, so the rest of the Art of Europe galleries on the second level await my return.

Photopost: A Visit to the MFA, part two


On my second visit to the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, I began a slow and studious exploration of the Art of the Ancient World.  I had trouble making a connection with the art at first as there seemed to be no story linking them together.  Galleries adjacent to one another held Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek, and Roman art.  Thousands of years, and thousands of miles, and thousands of cultures side by side.  But I did make a connection looking at the sculptures of ancient people and gazing into their eyes.  When face to face with a person it is hard to maintain eye contact, but here I could look into the eyes of humans who lived millennia ago and they had so much to say.  One Greek sculpture, Woman from a funerary monument, almost looked alive in her expression of grief.

To mix things up, I moved on to the Contemporary Art collections. Ancient art memorialized people and honored gods, but contemporary art asks you questions.  The descriptions, the writing on the wall, even the art itself ask questions.  Art here is more a reflection of the viewer, literally in the case of Untitled (Shu-red).  I spent more time that I should be willing to admit trying to take a selfie in its lacquered surface and finding myself delightfully disoriented.  Art also asks the tough questions, like “Why?” and “How can we let this happen?”  A sobering gallery collects artists’ responses to the 2011 earthquake in Japan.  The photographs and film here capture more pain and poignancy than any other news report.

There’s still much more to see and experience at the MFA, so I hope I return soon.

Previously:

Photopost: A Visit to the MFA, part one


For the first time in several years, I have a membership to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.  I’m working on putting it to use by visiting the Museum and methodically but casually working my way through the galleries absorbing the art on display and sharing what I learn.

On a recent Sunday afternoon, I explored the third floor, home to the Museum’s collection of 20th-century art.  It is a quiet place in the museum even on a busy weekend.  A man pushing his sleeping child in a stroller along a window-lined corridor told me “This is the best part of the museum!”

I was impressed particularly by the MFA’s strong collections of 20th Century Art but African-American artists, Boston-area artists, and some who are both. Some artists I learned about for the first time that I’m really drawn to are Eldzier Cortor, Allan Rohan Crite, and Charles Sheeler.  In addition to a variety of modern paintings, sculpture and decorative arts, the third floor hosts an excellent exhibit of photography of Gordon Parks, who returned to his home town of  Fort Scott, Kansas for a photo essay in 1950.

Stopped for a selfie en route to the third floor.
El Fuego by José Clemente Orozco
Cercle du Blé by Matta (Roberto Sebastián Matta Echaurren)

 

Room No. V by Eldzier Cortor
Pigeons by John Sloan.
Tire Jumping in Front of My Window by Allan Rohan Crite
Big Wind In Georgia by Hale Woodruff
Room in Brooklyn by Edward Hopper

 

Old Brooklyn Bridge by Joseph Stella
Art Deco clocks.
The Pool Game by Jacob Lawrence
The Door by David Aronson
Venus by Fernando Botero
Deer’s Skull with Pedernal by Georgia O’Keefe
Hot Still-Scape for Six Colors – 7th Avenue Style by Stuart Davis
New England Irrelevancies by Charles Sheeler
The Arrangement of Things by Ross Bleckner with an appreciator of fine art.