Movie Review: Mathematically Alive


Title: Mathematically Alive: A Story of Fandom
Release Date: 2007
Director: Joseph Coburn & Katherine Foronjy
Production Co: Vitamin Enriched Inc.
Country: United States
Language: English
Genre: Documentary / Sports
Rating: ***

Summary/Review:

This movie is about something near and dear to my heart – fandom of the New York Mets.  Set during the historic 2006 season when the Mets lead the National League in wins and made it as far as the 7th game of the championship series, the documentarians track several diehard fans through their game rituals and Mets-centered lives.  The premise is very similar to Still We Believe: The Boston Red Sox Movie, but without support of the Mets and Major League Baseball, Mathematically Alive lacks the glitz and production values of the Red Sox film.  Major League Baseball trademarks and ballgame footage (and even Mike Piazza’s face!) are pixellated out of the movie.  The affect though makes this even more of fan-based film, by fans and for fans, and Mets fans true to their blue-color heritage are not about glitz.  I was especially excited to see the son of a good friend near the end of the film pontificating wisely about his favorite team.  A must-see for Mets fans, recommended for baseball fans, and others may be interested if sports fandom interests them.

Support Sharon and Team McGraw


I have an awesome friend name Sharon.  Today is her birthday but that’s not what this post is about.  I’m writing because in exactly one month Sharon will be running in the New York City Marathon.  Sharon’s story is inspiring in that just the past two years she’s lost a lot of weight, got in shape, and built up her strength and ability to run many, many miles.

But it gets better than that.  Sharon is running as a member of Team McGraw to support the Tug McGraw Foundation.  If you’re not aware, Tug McGraw is a major league baseball relief pitcher who helped the New York Mets win their first World Series in 1969.  When the Mets were contending for the pennant again in 1973, Tug coined the team’s famous rallying cry “Ya Gotta Believe!”  Later in his career, McGraw pitched for the Philadelphia Phillies and was on the mound when that team won its first World Series in 1980.  As a result, Tug is a rare player who is beloved in both New York and Philadelphia.

Tug McGraw died in 2004 as a result of a brain tumor.  Which brings us back to Sharon who is running to support the Tug McGraw Foundation and enhance the quality of life of people living with brain tumors, post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injuries.  Sharon has been working hard to raise a lot of money, so if you read this, please consider taking a moment to donate to Sharon’s fundraising efforts and wish her well in the New York City Marathon.