Posts Tagged ‘Photographs’

Photopost: As If It Were Already Here

On a gorgeous Sunday afternoon in Boston, my family and I visited the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway to experience the monumental work of art As If It Were Already Here by Janet Echelman.  At first it felt underwhelming, pretty, but smaller than expected.  But as I walked under and around the sculpture I couldn’t help but notice how it interacts with sun and sky, buildings and trees, always changing even with a small change of perspective.  So I took a ton of pictures.  You can see them below, but definitely check it out in person.

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Photopost: Getting Dizzy With Izzy

I made another first time in a long time visit to a Boston institution with a day out at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.  Unlike the Museum of Fine Arts, there is only one work of art at the Gardner Museum, a collaboration of Mrs. Gardner and thousands of painters, sculptors, designers, architects, and gardeners.  This was my first visit since the opening of the new Renzo Piano wing, which is impressive, but seems mostly a utilitarian annex to the historic museum.  It was also the first time I’ve been to the museum since photography is allowed, although only of the courtyard on the main level.  Plenty of scofflaws took photos from the upper levels too, but were only stopped by the guards when using flash.  I followed Mrs. Gardner’s preference of immersing myself in the art and beauty.

Photopost: Bronx Zoo

On our last day in New York, we visited the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo.  This was a second visit for Peter, a couple of dozen visits for me, and countless more for my mother.  In short, the zoo is a place we all love.  Highlights include seeing baboons and ibex on hillside, sunning lions and giraffes, baby gorillas galore, and the flitter-flutter of the butterfly garden.

Alpaca

Feeding goats

Bathing bear

Baby baboon and mother

Baby baboon in action!

Resting giraffe

Baby gorilla

Beautiful butterfly

Photopost: Brooklyn Bridge

A highlight of any visit to New York is to stroll across the famed suspension bridge to Brooklyn.  I did this for the first time as a child over 30 years ago when the bridge was mobbed with people heading to an Irish festival in Brooklyn.  I’ve been back a half-dozen times since and generally it’s been serene.  But on this occasion, the first time for my son, it was as crowded as my first time even though there seemed to be no special event.

Bridge cables and soaring towers

Toy cars for sale. Selfie sticks were also a popular item sold and used on the bridge.

Manhattan skyline

The love locks trend has caught on big on Brooklyn Bridge

A gazillion people crossing the bridge at once, give or take a zill.

Photopost: The Snow Rabbits of Allston

A snow mound in front of my place of work has become a gathering place for at least five rabbits (there could be more but rabbits can’t count beyond four).

Photopost: Wachusett Meadow

For Father’s Day this year, we once again visited one of the most beautiful places on earth, Wachusett Meadow Wildlife Sanctuary in Princeton, MA.  I guess it’s a tradition now.

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Frog on a log. Far fewer than we saw last year.

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We had no idea what these red bumps were so we showed this picture to the naturalist. He believes it’s the remains of a slime mold.

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Looking out over the Beaver Pond.

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Daisy in the meadow.

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The Meadow changes with every step as the contours shift with a new perspective.

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Purple flowers (I’m an archivist, not a botanist, all right!)

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More wildflowers.

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The stone wall, a New England tradition.

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Frog on a lily pad.

Previously: Photopost: Wachusett Meadow (2012)

Photopost: Wake Up The Earth 2013

Spring descended on Jamaica Plain this past weekend with the annual Wake Up the Earth Festival presented by Spontaneous Celebrations. This was the 35th annual festival, an event that grew out of the “highway revolt” of the 1960s & 70s when local activists opposed the construction of highway infrastructure in Jamaica Plain & Roxbury, leading to the creation of the Southwest Corridor as a system of train lines, bike paths, and parks that we enjoy today. Ironically, some people who want to create new prioritized highway infrastructure for cars marched in this year’s parade which I guess shows that this festival takes all kinds.  The festival itself was home to many tents of activists of many causes, food, games, and musical performances.  My family and I sang a few songs with the intergenerational chorus SingPositive, JP in preparation for our concert on May 19th.  We also danced to Maaak Pelletier’s jam band the Mystical Misfits as they played Grateful Dead classics.  Finally, the potato sack slide down the hillside was great fun for everyone.

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A peace sign and yin yang grow out of the hillside at Jamaica Pond’s Sugar Bowl.

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Peace and flowers!

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The Brendan Behan quote seems appropriate to the occassion.

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Spanish banner for the festival.

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Here comes the parade.

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The stilt walkers always impress.

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I’m pretty sure this woman participates every year.

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The theme of the year is snakes and these folks won the Best Family Costume award.

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Hula hooping is another big highlight of the festival.

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Mobile percussion unit.

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The wolf and the lamb dance in the street.

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A rocking marching band and dancing stilt walker.

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Scholars from my son’s school march.

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Getting brassy.

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The Mystical Misfits lead the dance.

More photos from the parade and festival on Universal Hub and JP Patch.

Previously:

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