Podcasts of the Week Ending July 23rd


Decoder RingTootsie Shot

How the shot of a movie protagonist walking on crowded New York City sidewalk became iconic, and how its meaning has changed over time.

Radio BostonAdvocates Want To Make The T Free. So How Would That Actually Work?

Free public transportation is one of the greatest measures a city can take for its health, affordability, and reducing harm to the environment.

This Day in Esoteric Political HistoryThe Lost Robert E. Lee Oath Theory

The American historical memory is short and twisted.  Example: on July 22, 1975 the United States Congress voted to restore citizenship to a long dead of a traitorous insurrection.

Throughline Olympics: Behind The Five Rings

A short history of how the International Olympics Committee and corporate sponsors have exploited athletes and host cities for profits.

The TruthZoe Butterfly

An audio drama about an 8-year-old who connects more with a nature documentary narrator than any people in her life.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

Podcasts of the Week Ending July 10


Radio Boston :: Remembering, And Re-Examining, The Mayflower

The town of Plymouth commemorates the 400th anniversary of the arrival of Pilgrim settlers.  This podcast offers multiple perspectives on history and how it is remembered.

Twenty Thousand Hertz :: Stay Tuned

When I was a kid, I was a fan of Mel Blanc and dreamed of doing voice acting for cartoons.  In this podcast we meet some people who made that dream come true!


Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

Podcasts of the Week Ending May 15


Consider This ::  How One LA Neighborhood Reveals The Racist Architecture Of American Homeownership

The story of a vibrant Black neighborhood destroyed to build a highway is an all too familiar story in the US.

99% Invisible :: Tanz Tanz Revolution

How the Berlin Wall, and its fall, lead to Berlin becoming a center of Techno dance music.

Radio Boston :: New Data On Chelsea’s Guaranteed Basic Income Program

To help struggling people in Chelsea, MA, the city gave them direct cash payments as relief.  Good things happened.

What Next :: The Palestinian Perspective

A rarely heard perspective on the continuing crisis between Israel and Palestine.

What Next :: I Was a Teenager in a Syrian Prison

Omar Alshogre tells his story of being imprisoned for protesting the Syrian regime and eventually becoming a student at Georgetown University.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

Podcasts of the Week Ending April 24


Afropop Worldwide :: Punk in Africa

Punk is not a genre typically associated with Africa but the music of rage both personal and political has found its niche in countries dealing with imperialism, apartheid, poverty, and political corruption.

Fresh Air ::  The Social Psychologist Who Works To Reduce Harm In Policing

Regulating police behavior rather than focusing on the attitudes of individual police officers is the approach advocated by one researcher.

Radio Boston :: Former Boston City Councilor Tito Jackson Reunites With Birth Mother

A heart-warming story of Tito Jackson, one of my favorite Bostonians, meeting his birth mother for the first time.

What Next :: Fear and Paranoia in American Policing

Police officers are trained to be terrified by everything around them leading to their inscrutable violent actions.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

Podcasts of the Week Ending April 3


Fresh Air :: The High Stakes Of Amazon’s ‘One-Click America’

The vote to unionize an Amazon warehouse in Alabama and what that means for labor in America.

Planet Money ::  Socialism 101

A primer on a widely misunderstood economic theory.

Radio Boston ::  New Study Supports Suffolk DA Rollins’ Focus More On Serious, Violent Crimes

Rachael Rollins ran for and was elected as Suffolk County District Attorney promising not to prosecute many nonviolent offenses and focus on more serious crimes.  Newly released data is proving her approach to be correct.

Radiolab :: What Up, Holmes?

Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes originated a metaphor for free speech as “the marketplace of ideas,” but is there a better way to conceptualize freedom of speech?

This Day in Esoteric Political History :: Three Mile Meltdown

A partial nuclear meltdown at a nuclear power plant in Pennsylvania was apparently not as bad as it is always made out to be.

Throughline :: Our Own People

The story of a social justice activist I’ve never heard of before, Yuri Kochiyama. A Japanese-American woman who fought for Asian American equality, Kochiyama allied herself with numerous liberation movements. She was friends was Malcolm X and held him as he died.

What Next :: Can a Highway Be Racist?

There’s a long history in the United States of working class BIPOC communities being leveled to build and enlarge highways.  The freeway revolt against this practice continues in Houston.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

Podcast of the Week Ending January 22


Radio Boston :: Four Black Leaders In Boston Who Are Carrying On The King Legacy

Interviews with four impressive Black Bostonians: Monica Cannon-Grant, State Rep. Liz Miranda, Imari Paris Jeffries, and Michael Bobbitt.

Strong Songs :: “Space Oddity” and “Starman” by David Bowie

This new-to-me podcast breaks down the music and lyrics of two of my favorite Bowie songs.

The Brattle Film Podcast :: State of the Cinema

A discussion of how movie theaters are struggling against competition from streaming services and COVID. Will cinema be able to return to normal once the pandemic is over, and is that even desirable?

The Moth :: Birds of a Feather

Stories about birds: specifically ravens, chickens, and a highly-educated grey parrot.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

 

Podcasts of the Week Ending August 29


Mortified :: How to Run a TV Network as a Teenager

This story of a man reminiscing about the fantasy tv network reminds me of my own childhood.  I had my own radio station – WLTS – which I recorded on cassette tapes with me as the DJ.

99% Invisible :: The Revolutionary Post

The United States Post Office is under attack from right-wing politicians.  This podcast explores the history of how the USPS actually created America.

Radio Boston :: Remembering Anthony Martignetti, Star Of Prince Spaghetti Ad

The star of an iconic advertisement filmed in Boston’s North End has died at the age of 63. In 1969, the North End was an ethnic enclave of Italian Americans and spaghetti was a dish not familiar in mainstream America.  How the times change in one lifetime.


RUNNING TALLY OF PODCAST OF THE WEEK APPEARANCES

Podcasts of the Week Ending August 1


Anthropocene Reviewed :: Mortification and Civilization

John Green evaluates how we remember the most embarrassing moments of our life and the definition of civilization.

Memory Palace :: A Brief Eulogy for a Minor League Baseball Team

The cancellation of minor league baseball’s 2020 season due to the COVID-19 pandemic also means that the Red Sox Triple A farm team will not play a final season in Pawtucket, RI before moving to a new ballpark in Worcester, MA.

Radio Boston :: Rep. John Lewis Is The First Black Lawmaker To Lie In State In The Capitol Rotunda

Two great Boston leaders, Tito Jackson and Rev. Mariama White-Hammond reflect on the life and legacy of John Lewis.

Radiolab :: Dispatches from 1918

The history of the deadly influenza virus, its lingering effects and what it can teach us about COVID-19.

Retro Disney World :: Haunted Mansion with Kat Cressida

Interview with a pioneering woman voice actor on Disney Parks attractions.


Podcasts of the Week Ending May 23


All Songs Considered :: Little Richard’s Life in 10 Songs

A tribute to the groundbreaking Rock n’ Roll artist through music.

Fresh Air :: Janelle Monáe

An interview with one of my favorite musicians, actors, style icons, and all around people.

The Politics of Everything :: Is Baseball Safe?

MLB is planning to return for a shortened season, but will it be safe for players, coaches, umpires, and other ballpark employees with the continuing threat of COVID-19?

Radio Boston :: As Mass. Reopens, Are You Ready To Start Riding The T Again?

Decades of disinvestment in Boston’s public transportation creates the conditions where many commuters will not feel they can safely travel while practicing social distancing.

Radiolab :: Speedy Beet

Beethoveen may have composed his music to be played at a much faster tempo leading to his music being seen in a different light.

Snap Judgment :: The Country Doctor

The story of an Islamic doctor who loves serving the community in a small Minnesota town until he learns that most of the people their voted for Trump.


Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Appearances in 2020

Podcasts of the Week Ending February 29th


Radio Boston :: School Choice: A Push For Reform Or A Disruption Movement?

Education historians Diane Ravitch and Jack Schneider discuss three decades of flawed “education reform” and what should be done instead to provide equitable public education.

Fresh Air :: The Supreme Court’s Battle For A ‘More Unjust’ America

The Supreme Court is  not supposed to be a partisan organization but since the Nixon presidency, it has taken sides with corporations and the wealthy against the poorest and most vulnerable Americans.

Throughline :: The Invisible Border

A history of the Troubles in Northern Ireland, the agreement that brought a fragile peace to the region, and how Brexit may undo 20 years of progress.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Appearances in 2020