Podcasts for Two Weeks Ending September 25


Scientific American 60-Second ScienceDinosaurs Lived–and Made Little Dinos–in the Arctic

Dinosaurs were so cool. Literally!

This Day in Esoteric Political HistoryAttica

The attrocity at a New York state prison, the media complicity in perpetuating the false narrative of the authorities, and how little has changed in criminal justice in 50 years since.

This Day in Esoteric Political HistoryCalendar Confusion

That time in 1752 when everyone in the British Empire lost 11 days.

Twenty Thousand HertzListening to the Movies

How audio description for movies originated and how it is done.

What NextEmpty Shelves Everywhere

Ongoing supply chain problems of the global pandemic.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

Podcasts of Two Weeks Ending September 11


Hub HistoryBoston’s Oldest Buildings and Where to Find Them, with Joe Bagley

Boston city archaeologist Joe Bagley talks about his new book about Boston’s historic architecture.

The Memory PalaceThe Life and Works of a Monumental Figure

The story of social activist Jane Addams.

This American Life This Is Just Some Songs

A mixtape of stories.

This Day in Esoteric Political HistoryTeacher In Space

In the 1980s when it came time for ordinary civilians to go to space, teachers were the obvious choice.  This podcast is especially interesting about Barbara Morgan who was Christa McAullife’s back-up and became a career astronaut.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

Podcasts of the Week Ending August 28


This Day in Esoteric Political HistoryThe Battle of Blair Mountain (1921)

A century ago in West Virginia, the largest labor uprising in American history began.  The US government responded with aerial bombing.

What NextWhat Does Haiti Actually Need?

Haiti doesn’t have bad luck but suffers from over a century of imperialism and international aid programs that rarely get money and resources to Haitians.

 

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

Podcast of the Week Ending July 31


This Day in Esoteric Political History :: Kerner and “The Long Hot Summer” (1967)

A government commission produced a report in 1967 showing that the USA needed to stop overpolicing Black communities.  It was ignored.

This Day in Esoteric Political History :: The U.S. Rewrites the Haitian Constitution (1915)

The poverty and political instability of modern-day Haiti has its roots in United States’ imperialism from over a century ago.

What Next :: On the Front Lines of California’s Wildfires

Meet some of the incarcerated women who fight wildfires in California at great risk to themselves for little pay.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

Podcasts of the Week Ending July 23rd


Decoder RingTootsie Shot

How the shot of a movie protagonist walking on crowded New York City sidewalk became iconic, and how its meaning has changed over time.

Radio BostonAdvocates Want To Make The T Free. So How Would That Actually Work?

Free public transportation is one of the greatest measures a city can take for its health, affordability, and reducing harm to the environment.

This Day in Esoteric Political HistoryThe Lost Robert E. Lee Oath Theory

The American historical memory is short and twisted.  Example: on July 22, 1975 the United States Congress voted to restore citizenship to a long dead of a traitorous insurrection.

Throughline Olympics: Behind The Five Rings

A short history of how the International Olympics Committee and corporate sponsors have exploited athletes and host cities for profits.

The TruthZoe Butterfly

An audio drama about an 8-year-old who connects more with a nature documentary narrator than any people in her life.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

Podcasts of the Week Ending July 2


 

Decoder Ring :: The Invention of Hydration

How bottled water became a mainstream commodity and the questionable claims of the wellness industry that undergird our collective thirst for hydration.

Decoder Ring :: That Seattle Muzak Sound

The history of Muzak, first created to provide background music to encourage productivity, how it diverged from popular music in the 1960s, and its strange intersection with the 1990s grunge scene. When I was a DJ at my college radio station, I used to play selections from Grunge Lite in the background when I talked.

Radiolab :: The Vanishing of Harry Pace

This 4-part series (with perhaps more episodes to come?) is the story of Harry Pace who founded Black Swan Records, a successful and influential Black-owned enterprise, a century.  He also worked to desegregate Chicago neighborhoods. And yet his grandchildren grew up knowing little about him and believing they were white!

This Day in Esoteric Political History :: Mandela in Boston (1990)

Nelson Mandela visited Boston in 1990 as part of a thank you tour for anti-apartheid activists in the area as well as because he had family in Boston. The podcast also touches on how Mandela became a figurehead for the American Civil Rights movement at a team when there weren’t clear leaders within the country.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

Podcasts of the Week Ending June 12


 

The Last ArchiveChildren of Zorin

A history of “fake news” through the story of a Soviet journalist who covered the United States in the 1970s with a conspiratorial bent.

Radiolab Breath

Stories about breathing from the miracle of a baby’s first breath to the history of teargas to the crash of breath mints during the pandemic.

This Day in Esoteric Political HistoryOllie!

Oliver North ran for Senate in 1994 and almost won, a terrifying preview of the Republican Party’s rightward lurch into neofascism.  I remember this election well.  I even saw John Warner and Marshall Coleman at a restaurant.

This Day in Esoteric Political History –  Those Pesky Fenians

If you don’t want to read When the Irish Invaded Canada, check out this short podcast about the history of the mid-19th century efforts of Irish American Civil War veterans attempting to bring the fight for Ireland’s independence to Canada.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

Podcasts of the Week Ending May 8


Fresh Air :: Remembering Astronaut Michael Collins

A vintage interview with Apollo 11 command capsule commander who most famously spent some time alone in space.

The Last Archive :: Monkey Business

The John Scopes trial and the origins of the American culture wars.

This Day in Esoteric Political History :: Kennedy’s Pulitzer Controversies (1957)

John F. Kennedy gained national attention when his book Profiles in Courage won the Pulitzer Prize.  I was particularly interested that his profiles tended to focus on Senators who aided “bipartisan compromise” even during times of slavery, and how valuing the idea of bipartisanship actually lead to dangerous outcomes.

Unspooled :: A Trip to the Moon

I’ve long enjoyed this podcast about classic movies and here Amy & Paul discuss their oldest film yet, the 119-year-old French space adventure A Trip to the Moon.

 

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

Podcasts of the Week Ending April 3


Fresh Air :: The High Stakes Of Amazon’s ‘One-Click America’

The vote to unionize an Amazon warehouse in Alabama and what that means for labor in America.

Planet Money ::  Socialism 101

A primer on a widely misunderstood economic theory.

Radio Boston ::  New Study Supports Suffolk DA Rollins’ Focus More On Serious, Violent Crimes

Rachael Rollins ran for and was elected as Suffolk County District Attorney promising not to prosecute many nonviolent offenses and focus on more serious crimes.  Newly released data is proving her approach to be correct.

Radiolab :: What Up, Holmes?

Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes originated a metaphor for free speech as “the marketplace of ideas,” but is there a better way to conceptualize freedom of speech?

This Day in Esoteric Political History :: Three Mile Meltdown

A partial nuclear meltdown at a nuclear power plant in Pennsylvania was apparently not as bad as it is always made out to be.

Throughline :: Our Own People

The story of a social justice activist I’ve never heard of before, Yuri Kochiyama. A Japanese-American woman who fought for Asian American equality, Kochiyama allied herself with numerous liberation movements. She was friends was Malcolm X and held him as he died.

What Next :: Can a Highway Be Racist?

There’s a long history in the United States of working class BIPOC communities being leveled to build and enlarge highways.  The freeway revolt against this practice continues in Houston.

Running Tally of Podcast of the Week Awards for 2021

Podcasts of the Week Ending December 12


Planet Money :: How the Rat Blew Up

The history of Scabby the Rat, the inflatable mainstay of union demonstrations.

This Day in Esoteric Public History :: United States vs One Book Called Ulysses (1933) w/ Kurt Andersen

The history of obscenity laws in the United States.

99% Invisible :: According to Need

A series about homelessness in the United States.

Throughline :: Supreme

A history of the Supreme Court that explains how it became the final arbiter of the law in the United States.

RUNNING TALLY OF PODCAST OF THE WEEK APPEARANCES