Podcasts of the Two Weeks Ending August 15


I subscribe to too many podcasts while simultaneously having less time to listen to them. Forgive the interlude as I catch you up on two weeks of podcasts.

Brattle Film Podcast :: Behind the Scenes on Boston Movies

The Brattle Theatre in Cambridge had a great series on Boston Movies and all four podcasts are worth listening to, but I particularly liked this final podcast where they interview on-set dresser Adam Roffman about the behind-the-scenes production of movies in Boston and how they’ve changed over time.

Fresh Air :: Jeffrey Toobin On The ‘Tragedy’ Of The Mueller Report

How the Democrats were out-maneuvered by the Trump administration allowing him to get away with obstruction of justice.

Radiolab :: Uncounted

An episode on voting rights focuses on the District of Columbia’s non-voting delegate to Congress and the movement to lower the voting age to 16.

This American Life :: Nice White Parents

A public middle school in Brooklyn with a predominately non-white student body deals with an unexpected influx of white students and the effects that of white parents involvement in the school operations.  This is the first episode of Chana Joffe-Walt’s series called Nice White Parents that is both fascinating in its exploration of the changes at one school over time and cringe-inducing by the careless and clueless behavior of white parents (and the school districts who cater to their interests).  I particularly like that Joffe-Walt asks tough questions and doesn’t let people get away without answering them.

Have You Heard :: Pandemics Pods: Parents, Privilege, Power, and Politics

Speaking of Nice White Parents, you may have heard of the latest trend of “pandemic pods” where parents pool together funds to hire a teacher or tutor to educate a small group of students at home instead of returning to school during the Covid-19 pandemic. This podcast explains the devastating effects this latest form of “white flight” will have and how it opens the doors to the worst offerings of disaster capitalists.

99% Invisible :: Policing the Open Road

A century ago, the rise of the automobile as a predominant form of transportation led to an increase of policing to enforce road rules. The changes lead to a vast increase in ordinary peoples’ interaction with the police, increased police power and professionalization, and even the loss of Constitutional protections against unreasonable search and seizures.

Throughline :: Reframing History: The Litter Myth

In the 1950s, industry leaders organized to create Keep America Beautiful that produced public service announcements against littering. The seemingly benign ads had the effect of transferring responsibility for the environment from industries that made disposable single-use packaging to the personal responsibility of consumers. This conflict in how to deal with environmental issues persists to this day, and corporations still rely on “greenwashing” to make them look environmentally responsible.

Code Switch :: Kamala, Joe, And The Fissures In The Base

If you listen to pundits, and the Democrats 2020 presidential candidate, you might come to believe that Black Americans are a monolithic voting bloc.  This myth is dispelled in Code Switch where the diversity of opinions and conflicts even within Black families over politics are strong.

Decoder Ring :: Mystery of the Mullet

The mullet hairstyle, short in front and long in back, is worn by a diversity of people ranging from macho men in rural communities to lesbian women, from hockey players to heavy metal heads. But the Oxford English Dictionary traces the use of the term “mullet” only to 1994, surprisingly late for a hairstyle identified with the 1980s.  Willa Paskin investigates this linguistic mystery.  Personally, I never heard the term mullet until the late 1990s and had heard them called short-longs prior to mullet gaining popularity.


RUNNING TALLY OF PODCAST OF THE WEEK APPEARANCES

Podcasts of the Week Ending June 6


Coronavirus Daily

:: The Cost Of Being “Essential”

Essential workers are suffering economically and physically as a result of the COVID-19 Pandemic.

::A Looming Financial Meltdown For America’s Schools

The COVID-19 is exacerbating the crisis of underfunded public schools.

Fresh Air

:: Rethinking The Migration Of All Living Things

From “invasive species” to “invasions of immigrants,” the movement of living beings are frequently decried for plants, animals, and humans, but science writer Sonia Shah proposes they are following a biological need.

:: Why GOP Leaders Back Trump’s ‘Proto-Authoritarian Cult’

Trump is bringing us closer and closer to a full-fascist state and has been able to do so because Republican officials have backed him all the way even when he goes against their purported beliefs.

Memory Palace :: A Park

A history of the importance of Lafayette Square in Washington, DC, scene of Trump’s terrifying display of authoritarian violence on peaceful protesters this week.

What Next :: A History of Violent Protest

The history of structural change in America all the way back to colonial times is based on violent protest.


Podcasts of the Week Ending November 23


Only one new podcast episode this week, plus a recommendation for a podcast series to listen to in its entirety (I’m only halfway through myself).

This American Life :: The Out Crowd

Important journalism for anyone who wants to know the extent of the crimes against humanity being carried out in our names at the border.

The Report

This 15-part podcast breaks down the Mueller Report for those of us who don’t have time to read the report and/or need an assist with the legalese.

 

Running tally of 2019 Podcast of the Week appearances:

Podcasts of the Week Ending March 9th


BackStory :: Oh, Bloody Hell

You ever wonder about the history of profanity in America? This podcast’s got that shit covered.

Code Switch :: When Disaster Strikes

Inequality rears its ugly head in America in many ways.  Code Switch explores how disaster aid is biased in favor of white, prosperous homeowners and against poorer, people of color who rent.

WBUR CommonHealth :: New Gene Therapy Shows Promise For Patients With Sickle Cell Disease

Gene therapy at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Hospital is working to cure sickle cell disease.

Fresh Air :: The White House And Its ‘Shadow Cabinet’ Of Fox News TV Hosts

How Fox News has becom the state media of the fascist administration in the White House.

99% Invisible :: The Known Unknown

The Tomb of the Unknown at Arlington Cemetery is meant to represent the remains of military lost in war that cannot be identified, but in the case of the Vietnam War, the remains buried there were in fact known and only slowly revealed to the family.

60 Second Science :: Warm-Blooded Animals Lost Ability to Heal the Heart

Warm-blooded animals are able to regulate body temperature thanks to Thyroid hormone, but it also prevents warm-blooded animals from being able to regenerate heart tissue.

Throughline :: American Shadows

A history of conspiracy theories in the United States going back to the Founding Fathers and the American Revolution.


Running tally of Podcast of the Week appearances:

Podcasts of the Week Ending January 19th


The New Yorker Radio Hour :: How “The Apprentice” Made Donald Trump, and a Boondoggle in Wisconsin

“Liberal” Hollywood, and now the “liberal” media, help shape the image of the current occupant of the White House.  This is something that’s pretty obvious to many of us, but it’s interesting to hear how it was done.

What’s Next :: The Gymnast Who Went Megaviral

You may have seen video of UCLA gymnast Katelyn Ohashi’s floor routine the past week.  Beyond just being a great routine, Ohashi’s performance is notable for her clear expression of joy and her teammates cheering and dancing on the sideline.  Rebecca Schuman explains why the attitude of collegiate gymnastics is so different from elite gymnasts in the Olympics.

The War on Cars :: Cars Versus Guns

People were shocked to see in a recent report that gun violence is the second largest killer of children in the United States.  What was overlooked is that the #1 killer of children in the United States is – and has been for a long time – car crashes.  The War on Cars panelists discuss American gun culture and car culture, their many similarities, and how they both allow so many preventable deaths to occur.

Planet Money :: The First Shutdown

The United States federal government is shutdown again.  Planet Money looks back in history to find the first government shutdown in 1879 as Congress fought with President Rutherford B. Hayes.  The reason is shocking.  Not only were former Confederates allowed to return to serving in the federal government, but enough of them were elected that they were able to take control of Congress (they were Democrats back then).  And to prevent the Hayes administration from enforcing African American voting rights, they shut down the government.  Just in case you ever wondered who really won the Civil War.


Running tally of Podcast of the Week appearances:

The Numbers Favor #Resistance


Lately I’ve been seeing some fatigue from among those of us fighting for American democracy against Trump, the Republicans, and those who support them.  It feels like that somehow they outnumber us and they always win.

I think it’s important for people to remember that the population of the United States is currently around 328 million. Fewer than 63 million people voted for Trump. That’s less than 20% of the US population. Some of the people who voted for Trump are people who always vote Republican, some hated Clinton, some were angry and wanted to stir shit up. None of these things are particularly defensible reasons to vote for Trump, but the point is that there is a portion of the Trump vote that did not come from Trump devotees.  Two years later, a portion of the people who were actually favorable to the idea of Trump as someone they’d actually like as President now feel betrayed and regret their point.  Some of them regret their votes now that they’ve seen Trump in action. Thus, the number of people who are devoted supporters of Trump is less than that 20% and getting smaller. Trump supporters are outnumbered 4 to 1, at the least.

Now obviously, there’s a large portion of that 80% + that cannot vote: children under 18, non-naturalized immigrants, & people disenfranchised by incarceration, even after they’ve served their time. But if there’s anything we’ve seen in the last 2 years it’s that those three groups – children, immigrants, and communities most affected by felony disenfranchisement – who have provided some of our most powerful leaders and activists. So if you’re feeling hopeless right now remember this: it’s not going to be easy but the numbers are GREATLY in our favor! Don’t give up, we need each and every one of you!